Close

Terms and Conditions

These terms and conditions of use refer to the London Review of Books and the London Review Bookshop website (www.lrb.co.uk — hereafter ‘LRB Website’). These terms and conditions apply to all users of the LRB Website ("you"), including individual subscribers to the print edition of the LRB who wish to take advantage of our free 'subscriber only' access to archived material ("individual users") and users who are authorised to access the LRB Website by subscribing institutions ("institutional users").

Each time you use the LRB Website you signify your acceptance of these terms and conditions. If you do not agree, or are not comfortable with any part of this document, your only remedy is not to use the LRB Website.


  1. By registering for access to the LRB Website and/or entering the LRB Website by whatever route of access, you agree to be bound by the terms and conditions currently prevailing.
  2. The London Review of Books ("LRB") reserves the right to change these terms and conditions at any time and you should check for any alterations regularly. Continued usage of the LRB Website subsequent to a change in the terms and conditions constitutes acceptance of the current terms and conditions.
  3. The terms and conditions of any subscription agreements which educational and other institutions have entered into with the LRB apply in addition to these terms and conditions.
  4. You undertake to indemnify the LRB fully for all losses damages and costs incurred as a result of your breaching these terms and conditions.
  5. The information you supply on registration to the LRB Website shall be accurate and complete. You will notify the LRB promptly of any changes of relevant details by emailing the registrar. You will not assist a non-registered person to gain access to the LRB Website by supplying them with your password. In the event that the LRB considers that you have breached the requirements governing registration, that you are in breach of these terms and conditions or that your or your institution's subscription to the LRB lapses, your registration to the LRB Website will be terminated.
  6. Each individual subscriber to the LRB (whether a person or organisation) is entitled to the registration of one person to use the 'subscriber only' content on the web site. This user is an 'individual user'.
  7. The London Review of Books operates a ‘no questions asked’ cancellation policy in accordance with UK legislation. Please contact us to cancel your subscription and receive a full refund for the cost of all unposted issues.
  8. Use of the 'subscriber only' content on the LRB Website is strictly for the personal use of each individual user who may read the content on the screen, download, store or print single copies for their own personal private non-commercial use only, and is not to be made available to or used by any other person for any purpose.
  9. Each institution which subscribes to the LRB is entitled to grant access to persons to register on and use the 'subscriber only' content on the web site under the terms and conditions of its subscription agreement with the LRB. These users are 'institutional users'.
  10. Each institutional user of the LRB may access and search the LRB database and view its entire contents, and may also reproduce insubstantial extracts from individual articles or other works in the database to which their institution's subscription provides access, including in academic assignments and theses, online and/or in print. All quotations must be credited to the author and the LRB. Institutional users are not permitted to reproduce any entire article or other work, or to make any commercial use of any LRB material (including sale, licensing or publication) without the LRB's prior written permission. Institutions may notify institutional users of any additional or different conditions of use which they have agreed with the LRB.
  11. Users may use any one computer to access the LRB web site 'subscriber only' content at any time, so long as that connection does not allow any other computer, networked or otherwise connected, to access 'subscriber only' content.
  12. The LRB Website and its contents are protected by copyright and other intellectual property rights. You acknowledge that all intellectual property rights including copyright in the LRB Website and its contents belong to or have been licensed to the LRB or are otherwise used by the LRB as permitted by applicable law.
  13. All intellectual property rights in articles, reviews and essays originally published in the print edition of the LRB and subsequently included on the LRB Website belong to or have been licensed to the LRB. This material is made available to you for use as set out in paragraph 8 (if you are an individual user) or paragraph 10 (if you are an institutional user) only. Save for such permitted use, you may not download, store, disseminate, republish, post, reproduce, translate or adapt such material in whole or in part in any form without the prior written permission of the LRB. To obtain such permission and the terms and conditions applying, contact the Rights and Permissions department.
  14. All intellectual property rights in images on the LRB Website are owned by the LRB except where another copyright holder is specifically attributed or credited. Save for such material taken for permitted use set out above, you may not download, store, disseminate, republish, post, reproduce, translate or adapt LRB’s images in whole or in part in any form without the prior written permission of the LRB. To obtain such permission and the terms and conditions applying, contact the Rights and Permissions department. Where another copyright holder is specifically attributed or credited you may not download, store, disseminate, republish, reproduce or translate such images in whole or in part in any form without the prior written permission of the copyright holder. The LRB will not undertake to supply contact details of any attributed or credited copyright holder.
  15. The LRB Website is provided on an 'as is' basis and the LRB gives no warranty that the LRB Website will be accessible by any particular browser, operating system or device.
  16. The LRB makes no express or implied representation and gives no warranty of any kind in relation to any content available on the LRB Website including as to the accuracy or reliability of any information either in its articles, essays and reviews or in the letters printed in its letter page or material supplied by third parties. The LRB excludes to the fullest extent permitted by law all liability of any kind (including liability for any losses, damages or costs) arising from the publication of any materials on the LRB Website or incurred as a consequence of using or relying on such materials.
  17. The LRB excludes to the fullest extent permitted by law all liability of any kind (including liability for any losses, damages or costs) for any legal or other consequences (including infringement of third party rights) of any links made to the LRB Website.
  18. The LRB is not responsible for the content of any material you encounter after leaving the LRB Website site via a link in it or otherwise. The LRB gives no warranty as to the accuracy or reliability of any such material and to the fullest extent permitted by law excludes all liability that may arise in respect of or as a consequence of using or relying on such material.
  19. This site may be used only for lawful purposes and in a manner which does not infringe the rights of, or restrict the use and enjoyment of the site by, any third party. In the event of a chat room, message board, forum and/or news group being set up on the LRB Website, the LRB will not undertake to monitor any material supplied and will give no warranty as to its accuracy, reliability, originality or decency. By posting any material you agree that you are solely responsible for ensuring that it is accurate and not obscene, defamatory, plagiarised or in breach of copyright, confidentiality or any other right of any person, and you undertake to indemnify the LRB against all claims, losses, damages and costs incurred in consequence of your posting of such material. The LRB will reserve the right to remove any such material posted at any time and without notice or explanation. The LRB will reserve the right to disclose the provenance of such material, republish it in any form it deems fit or edit or censor it. The LRB will reserve the right to terminate the registration of any person it considers to abuse access to any chat room, message board, forum or news group provided by the LRB.
  20. Any e-mail services supplied via the LRB Website are subject to these terms and conditions.
  21. You will not knowingly transmit any virus, malware, trojan or other harmful matter to the LRB Website. The LRB gives no warranty that the LRB Website is free from contaminating matter, viruses or other malicious software and to the fullest extent permitted by law disclaims all liability of any kind including liability for any damages, losses or costs resulting from damage to your computer or other property arising from access to the LRB Website, use of it or downloading material from it.
  22. The LRB does not warrant that the use of the LRB Website will be uninterrupted, and disclaims all liability to the fullest extent permitted by law for any damages, losses or costs incurred as a result of access to the LRB Website being interrupted, modified or discontinued.
  23. The LRB Website contains advertisements and promotional links to websites and other resources operated by third parties. While we would never knowingly link to a site which we believed to be trading in bad faith, the LRB makes no express or implied representations or warranties of any kind in respect of any third party websites or resources or their contents, and we take no responsibility for the content, privacy practices, goods or services offered by these websites and resources. The LRB excludes to the fullest extent permitted by law all liability for any damages or losses arising from access to such websites and resources. Any transaction effected with such a third party contacted via the LRB Website are subject to the terms and conditions imposed by the third party involved and the LRB accepts no responsibility or liability resulting from such transactions.
  24. The LRB disclaims liability to the fullest extent permitted by law for any damages, losses or costs incurred for unauthorised access or alterations of transmissions or data by third parties as consequence of visit to the LRB Website.
  25. While 'subscriber only' content on the LRB Website is currently provided free to subscribers to the print edition of the LRB, the LRB reserves the right to impose a charge for access to some or all areas of the LRB Website without notice.
  26. These terms and conditions are governed by and will be interpreted in accordance with English law and any disputes relating to these terms and conditions will be subject to the non-exclusive jurisdiction of the courts of England and Wales.
  27. The various provisions of these terms and conditions are severable and if any provision is held to be invalid or unenforceable by any court of competent jurisdiction then such invalidity or unenforceability shall not affect the remaining provisions.
  28. If these terms and conditions are not accepted in full, use of the LRB Website must be terminated immediately.
Close

Letters

Vol. 29 No. 20 · 18 October 2007

Search by issue:

Should we have been there?

Perry Anderson yet again excoriates the Western powers’ role in the former Yugoslavia (LRB, 20 September). Anyone who knew nothing of the history of the recent conflict would gather from his account that it was as squalid an exercise in American-led Western imperialism as Iraq. Has he forgotten the appalling situation that Milosevic’s campaign for Serbian hegemony had created in Bosnia-Herzegovina? He piously scolds the US for failing to obtain a Security Council mandate for military intervention, while pointedly refraining from mentioning the automatic Russian veto on any action against the Serbs that was at all likely to be effective. He has yet, to my knowledge, to show that essential US interests were served in any way by military involvement in Yugoslavia, but repeats the canard nonetheless. He characterises the US-led military action in the Balkans as a ‘full-scale military offensive’, a ‘blitz’, an ‘assault’, but averts his eyes from the inconvenient fact that at the time its aim was perceived everywhere other than in Moscow as being solely to rescue beleaguered civilians and thereby to prevent the shedding of more blood. To assert, as Anderson does, that a casus belli was ‘trumped up’, and that ‘a straight line led’ from the intervention in Yugoslavia to the invasion of Iraq is an affront. Moreover, the operation was an unqualified success; in fact, the Americans were promptly criticised for not having saved more lives by intervening earlier. Perhaps it was their success (which threw into even sharper relief the UN’s own failure to protect the victims of Milosevic and Karadzic at Srebrenica, Sarajevo and elsewhere) that Anderson finds unforgivable. He wants us to regret that this military operation was undertaken and so he uses what has happened in Iraq and Afghanistan to discredit American and European motives in the former Yugoslavia.

Robert Horwood
Åland Islands

Unfair to the EU

I wonder whether Perry Anderson’s pessimism about the EU is entirely justified. Employment lawyers who represent workers including Poles and Lithuanians at UK employment tribunals, as I do, know how much positive UK legislation comes directly from the EU. For example, the Working Time Regulations of 1998 provide for statutory rest breaks, and the rule that all workers are entitled to four weeks’ paid holiday a year originates from an EU health directive. The enhancement of the right of part-time workers to claim unfair dismissal resulted from the application by the European Court of Justice of EU equal opportunities law to British law. And so on.

Chris Purnell
Orpington, Kent

The Conjugal Bed

James Shapiro alludes to the ‘second best bed’ that Shakespeare bequeathed to Ann Hathaway (LRB, 4 October). A lot of nonsense is written about that bed. It was almost certainly occupied by Will and Ann when he returned to Stratford, and she probably used it when giving birth: it was, in other words, the conjugal bed. The best bed would have been kept for guests, just as in many British households today, the best parlour isn’t used every day, but reserved for special occasions such as weddings and funerals.

Kenneth Hunter
London N3

Disliking the McCanns

I disliked Anne Enright almost as much as the McCanns after reading her article (LRB, 4 October), almost as much as I dislike myself for disliking the McCanns, for disliking Anne Enright, you for publishing Anne Enright’s article, and me for reading it (I didn’t have to do that). Where will it all end?

Brian Lee
Hexham, Northumberland

Anything but Shy

There is one aspect of Fritz Stern’s ‘uneasiness’ that Thomas Laqueur failed to mention in his response to Tony Judt’s testy letter (Letters, 20 September). In November 2004, Stern was presented with the Leo Baeck Medal by Joschka Fischer, then the German foreign secretary, at a ceremony in New York. In his acceptance speech, Stern spoke gloomily about politics in the US, and about ‘the fatality of civic passivity or indifference’. A few weeks later, he told a journalist that while he didn’t believe the US was in danger of turning fascist, the religiosity of the US made him wary. It reminded him of political conditions in Germany before the ascent of Hitler. There was at that time, he said, ‘a longing for a new authoritarianism with some kind of religious orientation and above all a greater communal belongingness. There are some similarities in the mood then and the mood now, although also significant differences.’ There were those who gave up in Germany: they made the Fascists into unassailable monsters, and out of fear and indifference, according to Stern, watched their demons get bigger and more real.

George Bush is made into a monster by liberals such as Stern when they compare the US under his administration to Weimar. But Bush isn’t a dictator, and the religiosity of Americans is hardly a new development. The US is a prosperous and powerful country, very unlike Weimar. Despite appearances to the contrary, its politics are stable; its national elections are contests for succession. The Bush administration is bad enough in its own right not to require comparison with Germany in the 1920s.

Inigo Thomas
New York

A pedant writes

Martin Sanderson dislikes my choice of the word ‘masterful’ – rather than ‘masterly’ – to describe Rosemary Hill’s biography of Pugin (Letters, 4 October). But ‘masterful’ is what I meant. Not only is the book skilful, it is written with force and authority. ‘Masterly’ would have conveyed a different meaning, and not the one I wanted.

Dinah Birch
University of Liverpool

The Truth about Kadare

Ismail Kadare may well be a contentious figure in the Balkans – with Serbs because of his support for the Kosovar Albanians and with Albanians because of his unexpected move to Paris shortly before the Communist regime collapsed – but Barbara Graziosi surely overstates the case when she describes his ‘treatment of the Slavs’ in The File on H as ‘deadly’ (Letters, 4 October). If, as she claims, his reimagining of Parry and Lord’s researches into Homeric epic in the Balkans is misleading because he has their fictional counterparts recording Albanian rather than Yugoslavian bards, her account of the novel is equally so.

Throughout The File on H, Kadare casts doubt on the reliability of the narrative. It is, as we’re frequently reminded, pieced together from gossip, hearsay and the accounts of variously self-interested witnesses and informers. There is no definitive version of events; everything is skewed, if not wholly thrown out of proportion, by the misperceptions and exaggerations of each individual ‘source’. The circumstances in which the fictional scholars’ tape recorder is destroyed and the motives of the attackers remain unclear, and while it’s true that the monk who appears to lodge the original idea for the attack in the mind of a hermit – who may or may not be one of the perpetrators – is a Serb, the only evidence of his involvement is the account of an enthusiastic though rather dull-witted informer, while the only accusations against him are made by an overheated and clearly biased journalist. To ascribe the opinions and beliefs of any of these characters to Kadare himself and leap to the conclusion that he is a ‘committed anti-Slav nationalist’ is absurd. On the contrary. The File on H is a satire which, like The Concert, The Successor and other Kadare novels, shows precisely how nationalism, parochialism and superstition distort the truth. The Albanians in the novel aren’t duped by a Serb, as Graziosi would have it; they are duped by their own prejudices.

As for Graziosi’s claim that readers of the English translation will come away with the mistaken impression that the real Parry and Lord made their Homeric discoveries in Albania, the translator’s note couldn’t be any clearer: ‘The bulk of the material that Parry and Lord brought back from the Balkans was gathered in Yugoslavia, not Albania.’

Tom Phillips
Bristol

Non-Doms

Ross McKibbin despairs of Gordon Brown (LRB, 4 October). But he falls into error when he says that Gordon Brown ‘created a category of “non-domiciliary" super-rich’. The curious rules on domicile, part of the British tax system, existed long before Brown became chancellor. Indeed they existed long before he was born. I appreciate this is probably of little interest to your readers. But I have a background in taxation and, like many specialists, get satisfaction from such pedantry.

Neil Ramsay
Wisbech, Cambridgeshire

Read anywhere with the London Review of Books app, available now from the App Store for Apple devices, Google Play for Android devices and Amazon for your Kindle Fire.

Sign up to our newsletter

For highlights from the latest issue, our archive and the blog, as well as news, events and exclusive promotions.