Close

Terms and Conditions

These terms and conditions of use refer to the London Review of Books and the London Review Bookshop website (www.lrb.co.uk — hereafter ‘LRB Website’). These terms and conditions apply to all users of the LRB Website ("you"), including individual subscribers to the print edition of the LRB who wish to take advantage of our free 'subscriber only' access to archived material ("individual users") and users who are authorised to access the LRB Website by subscribing institutions ("institutional users").

Each time you use the LRB Website you signify your acceptance of these terms and conditions. If you do not agree, or are not comfortable with any part of this document, your only remedy is not to use the LRB Website.


  1. By registering for access to the LRB Website and/or entering the LRB Website by whatever route of access, you agree to be bound by the terms and conditions currently prevailing.
  2. The London Review of Books ("LRB") reserves the right to change these terms and conditions at any time and you should check for any alterations regularly. Continued usage of the LRB Website subsequent to a change in the terms and conditions constitutes acceptance of the current terms and conditions.
  3. The terms and conditions of any subscription agreements which educational and other institutions have entered into with the LRB apply in addition to these terms and conditions.
  4. You undertake to indemnify the LRB fully for all losses damages and costs incurred as a result of your breaching these terms and conditions.
  5. The information you supply on registration to the LRB Website shall be accurate and complete. You will notify the LRB promptly of any changes of relevant details by emailing the registrar. You will not assist a non-registered person to gain access to the LRB Website by supplying them with your password. In the event that the LRB considers that you have breached the requirements governing registration, that you are in breach of these terms and conditions or that your or your institution's subscription to the LRB lapses, your registration to the LRB Website will be terminated.
  6. Each individual subscriber to the LRB (whether a person or organisation) is entitled to the registration of one person to use the 'subscriber only' content on the web site. This user is an 'individual user'.
  7. The London Review of Books operates a ‘no questions asked’ cancellation policy in accordance with UK legislation. Please contact us to cancel your subscription and receive a full refund for the cost of all unposted issues.
  8. Use of the 'subscriber only' content on the LRB Website is strictly for the personal use of each individual user who may read the content on the screen, download, store or print single copies for their own personal private non-commercial use only, and is not to be made available to or used by any other person for any purpose.
  9. Each institution which subscribes to the LRB is entitled to grant access to persons to register on and use the 'subscriber only' content on the web site under the terms and conditions of its subscription agreement with the LRB. These users are 'institutional users'.
  10. Each institutional user of the LRB may access and search the LRB database and view its entire contents, and may also reproduce insubstantial extracts from individual articles or other works in the database to which their institution's subscription provides access, including in academic assignments and theses, online and/or in print. All quotations must be credited to the author and the LRB. Institutional users are not permitted to reproduce any entire article or other work, or to make any commercial use of any LRB material (including sale, licensing or publication) without the LRB's prior written permission. Institutions may notify institutional users of any additional or different conditions of use which they have agreed with the LRB.
  11. Users may use any one computer to access the LRB web site 'subscriber only' content at any time, so long as that connection does not allow any other computer, networked or otherwise connected, to access 'subscriber only' content.
  12. The LRB Website and its contents are protected by copyright and other intellectual property rights. You acknowledge that all intellectual property rights including copyright in the LRB Website and its contents belong to or have been licensed to the LRB or are otherwise used by the LRB as permitted by applicable law.
  13. All intellectual property rights in articles, reviews and essays originally published in the print edition of the LRB and subsequently included on the LRB Website belong to or have been licensed to the LRB. This material is made available to you for use as set out in paragraph 8 (if you are an individual user) or paragraph 10 (if you are an institutional user) only. Save for such permitted use, you may not download, store, disseminate, republish, post, reproduce, translate or adapt such material in whole or in part in any form without the prior written permission of the LRB. To obtain such permission and the terms and conditions applying, contact the Rights and Permissions department.
  14. All intellectual property rights in images on the LRB Website are owned by the LRB except where another copyright holder is specifically attributed or credited. Save for such material taken for permitted use set out above, you may not download, store, disseminate, republish, post, reproduce, translate or adapt LRB’s images in whole or in part in any form without the prior written permission of the LRB. To obtain such permission and the terms and conditions applying, contact the Rights and Permissions department. Where another copyright holder is specifically attributed or credited you may not download, store, disseminate, republish, reproduce or translate such images in whole or in part in any form without the prior written permission of the copyright holder. The LRB will not undertake to supply contact details of any attributed or credited copyright holder.
  15. The LRB Website is provided on an 'as is' basis and the LRB gives no warranty that the LRB Website will be accessible by any particular browser, operating system or device.
  16. The LRB makes no express or implied representation and gives no warranty of any kind in relation to any content available on the LRB Website including as to the accuracy or reliability of any information either in its articles, essays and reviews or in the letters printed in its letter page or material supplied by third parties. The LRB excludes to the fullest extent permitted by law all liability of any kind (including liability for any losses, damages or costs) arising from the publication of any materials on the LRB Website or incurred as a consequence of using or relying on such materials.
  17. The LRB excludes to the fullest extent permitted by law all liability of any kind (including liability for any losses, damages or costs) for any legal or other consequences (including infringement of third party rights) of any links made to the LRB Website.
  18. The LRB is not responsible for the content of any material you encounter after leaving the LRB Website site via a link in it or otherwise. The LRB gives no warranty as to the accuracy or reliability of any such material and to the fullest extent permitted by law excludes all liability that may arise in respect of or as a consequence of using or relying on such material.
  19. This site may be used only for lawful purposes and in a manner which does not infringe the rights of, or restrict the use and enjoyment of the site by, any third party. In the event of a chat room, message board, forum and/or news group being set up on the LRB Website, the LRB will not undertake to monitor any material supplied and will give no warranty as to its accuracy, reliability, originality or decency. By posting any material you agree that you are solely responsible for ensuring that it is accurate and not obscene, defamatory, plagiarised or in breach of copyright, confidentiality or any other right of any person, and you undertake to indemnify the LRB against all claims, losses, damages and costs incurred in consequence of your posting of such material. The LRB will reserve the right to remove any such material posted at any time and without notice or explanation. The LRB will reserve the right to disclose the provenance of such material, republish it in any form it deems fit or edit or censor it. The LRB will reserve the right to terminate the registration of any person it considers to abuse access to any chat room, message board, forum or news group provided by the LRB.
  20. Any e-mail services supplied via the LRB Website are subject to these terms and conditions.
  21. You will not knowingly transmit any virus, malware, trojan or other harmful matter to the LRB Website. The LRB gives no warranty that the LRB Website is free from contaminating matter, viruses or other malicious software and to the fullest extent permitted by law disclaims all liability of any kind including liability for any damages, losses or costs resulting from damage to your computer or other property arising from access to the LRB Website, use of it or downloading material from it.
  22. The LRB does not warrant that the use of the LRB Website will be uninterrupted, and disclaims all liability to the fullest extent permitted by law for any damages, losses or costs incurred as a result of access to the LRB Website being interrupted, modified or discontinued.
  23. The LRB Website contains advertisements and promotional links to websites and other resources operated by third parties. While we would never knowingly link to a site which we believed to be trading in bad faith, the LRB makes no express or implied representations or warranties of any kind in respect of any third party websites or resources or their contents, and we take no responsibility for the content, privacy practices, goods or services offered by these websites and resources. The LRB excludes to the fullest extent permitted by law all liability for any damages or losses arising from access to such websites and resources. Any transaction effected with such a third party contacted via the LRB Website are subject to the terms and conditions imposed by the third party involved and the LRB accepts no responsibility or liability resulting from such transactions.
  24. The LRB disclaims liability to the fullest extent permitted by law for any damages, losses or costs incurred for unauthorised access or alterations of transmissions or data by third parties as consequence of visit to the LRB Website.
  25. While 'subscriber only' content on the LRB Website is currently provided free to subscribers to the print edition of the LRB, the LRB reserves the right to impose a charge for access to some or all areas of the LRB Website without notice.
  26. These terms and conditions are governed by and will be interpreted in accordance with English law and any disputes relating to these terms and conditions will be subject to the non-exclusive jurisdiction of the courts of England and Wales.
  27. The various provisions of these terms and conditions are severable and if any provision is held to be invalid or unenforceable by any court of competent jurisdiction then such invalidity or unenforceability shall not affect the remaining provisions.
  28. If these terms and conditions are not accepted in full, use of the LRB Website must be terminated immediately.
Close

Letters

Vol. 28 No. 5 · 9 March 2006

Search by issue:

Call it xenophobia

Christopher Prendergast
University of Copenhagen

Absent Jews

James Wood suggests that one reason the 17th-century scholars who translated the King James Bible made the odd mistake was that ‘no Jew was involved’ on the committees supervising the translation from Hebrew (LRB, 23 February). The fact is that the Jewish population had been expelled from Britain by Edward I’s Edict of Expulsion in 1290. In 1655, Rabbi Menasseh Ben Israel from the synagogue in Amsterdam arrived in London to negotiate their return with Oliver Cromwell. Ben Israel’s absence from Amsterdam was much regretted by his star pupil, Baruch Spinoza, who was at the same time tried for blasphemy and excommunicated from the Jewish community. It might all have been avoided, he said, had Ben Israel not been in London.

Terence Kelly
Cork

Don’t get mad, get even

Malcolm Bull grossly distorts John Rawls’s view in The Law of Peoples (LRB, 9 February). Rawls plainly rejects the thought that it is morally legitimate in our circumstances to ‘threaten to use nuclear weapons against civilian populations, committing … genocide in the process’. Neither the doctrine of double effect nor the supreme emergency exemption provides grounds for any such thing. Indeed, Rawls explicitly rejects the line of thought that Bull attempts to pin on him in the particular cases of the fire bombing of Dresden and the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Bull also misrepresents Rawls on intervention with respect to outlaw states. In the case of something like a contemporary version of Aztec society featuring slave labour and human sacrifice, Rawls does not argue that since sanctions would surely fail, a liberal crusader state is morally justified in exterminating the recalcitrant population. His suggestion is that, first, such a society should be approached, through reason, by the community of nations. Where such overtures fail, the community would have a case for economic sanctions; if the sanctions and continuing appeals to reason fail, the community would have a prima facie case for some kind of forceful intervention. Genocide is not justified on any careful interpretation of what Rawls writes, and Rawls would never attempt to justify it. In particular, the mere failure ‘to develop a “well-ordered" society’ is not good grounds for intervention, on Rawls’s view, never mind for invasion and extermination. Bull’s suggestion is that we should give up on Anglo-liberal philosophy with its talk of rights and contracts, and turn to the notion of duties as it is spelled out – a bit opaquely – in Jacques Rancière. The opposition is surely false; we should not be willing to cede liberal political thought entirely to the neo-conservatives, their stooges and allies.

Evan Riley
University of Pittsburgh

How do we do it?

While I find many things to be more ‘appalled’ by in the world than mistaken word-breaks in the LRB, I agree with John Leath’s complaint about carelessness in this matter (Letters, 9 February). One of his examples may be wrong, though: ‘Victor-ians’, while split incorrectly according to United States syllabification (it should be ‘Victo-rians’), is correct by British standards (I’m going by my Oxford Advanced Learner’s Dictionary). But the LRB can do much worse than the examples Leath lists. Mistakes such as ‘entertain-ed’ are common, as I have noticed with mild annoyance ever since I first subscribed. What surprises me is not that these get by the editorial staff, but that there is no technology to automatically divide words in the right way. Or is it a perverse editorial choice?

Gordon Poole
Somewhere (undisclosed) in Italy

Communards

John Sturrock (LRB, 9 February) doesn’t mention Jules Vallès’s contact with Emile Zola. While many on the French left had a low view of L’Assommoir, Vallès hailed Zola as ‘un Communard de la plume’. Zola helped Vallès get work while in exile and encouraged him to write his trilogy. In 1884, shortly before Vallès’s death, when Zola was working on Germinal during his summer holiday at Mont-Dore, he spent hours talking to Vallès. Such direct contact with a Communard may have helped Zola to a more favourable view of the Commune than he would have later when he came to write La Débâcle. At the end of Germinal, Etienne, the strike-leader, is seen on his way to Paris, where he is to become an organiser for the First International. It would have been clear to contemporary readers that he was heading for the Paris Commune and that Zola was suggesting a positive conclusion to this great novel of class struggle.

Ian Birchall
London N9

Fiery Waters

Fritz Haber, whose life and work were discussed by Steven Shapin (LRB, 26 January), was not the first to propose the use of noxious chemicals as weapons. The 17th-century German chemist and alchemist Johann Glauber urged that his preparation of ‘fiery waters’ (hydrochloric and nitric acids) be showered on the Ottoman Turk invaders of Christian Hungary. The new weapons would be non-lethal: they were designed instead to make the enemy more vulnerable to conventional attack. It is unlikely that the idea was ever implemented.

Raymond Clayton
Stanford, California

Rimbaud, Verlaine, the Fish and the House

For a few months during the summer of 1873 Rimbaud and Verlaine lodged in a rooming house in Great College Street, Camden Town. This building, now known as 8 Royal College Street, NW1, is their only surviving home in London, and it was here that some of Rimbaud’s finest poetry was written.

They lived here at a time when their now fragile relationship was going through tortured and sometimes violent moments. It nearly came to an end with an incident that might in other circumstances have been almost trivial, but was enough to make Verlaine leave in haste for the next packet boat from St Katherine’s Dock. ‘I was approaching the house,’ he noted later, ‘when I saw Rimbaud observing me through an open window. For no good reason he started to snigger. I climbed the stairs anyway and went in. “Have you any idea how ridiculous you look, with your bottle of oil in one hand and your fish in the other?" said Rimbaud. I retaliated, because I can assure you that I definitely did not look ridiculous."’ The retaliation took the form of a swipe across Rimbaud’s face with the fish, after which Verlaine immediately departed for the Dock. Rimbaud pawned Verlaine’s clothes and met him in Brussels a week later, where Verlaine shot him with a pistol, wounding him in the wrist.

A campaign is now underway, with the support of the French government and many artists, writers and academics, both British and French, to save this 1820s building, which is now about to be sold. The vendor has, however, offered it, along with those on either side, to the campaign to try to find a prospective purchaser who will honour their architecture and historical associations. The search is now on for an academic or literary institution which might be looking for a Central London base that will include a seminar room, study centre or archive, with accommodation on either side. As campaign co-ordinator, I am receiving inquiries from potential purchasers with this in mind. I can be contacted by email on gerry.harrison@camden.gov.uk.

Gerry Harrison
London NW5

Backed by Gold

Martin Rollo says that South Africa obtained its independence in 1961 (Letters, 26 January). That was the year South Africa left the Commonwealth, but it had been independent for a long time. The Union of South Africa was formed in 1910. The old Zuid Afrikaansche Republiek, formed with the permission of Britain in 1852, included the Transvaal and the Orange Free State. When gold was discovered at the Witwatersrand (rand meaning ‘reef’) in the Transvaal in 1886, the republic minted gold coins, which, because of their origin, were referred to as ‘rands’.

Britain forced the union of the Afrikaner states with the Cape Colonies after the discovery of gold, and the pound was used as the official currency until the Afrikaners rebelled and restored the old republic and its currency. This led to the Boer War, after which Britain imposed its rule and renamed the currency the ‘pound’; it was convertible into gold until 1932, when British devaluation drove up the price of the precious metal. Once South Africa had declared itself a republic, it readopted the rand (ZAR).

Richard Cummings
Sag Harbor, New York

Bendy is best

Andrew Saint has allowed nostalgia to influence his judgment (LRB, 26 January). Routemaster buses were not ‘sleek’ machines but angular, noisy, smelly, cumbersome, obstructive, draughty and uncomfortable behemoths that made no concessions to their users. Modern buses have wider doors, and many can lower their suspension at stops and extrude ramps to help mothers with prams, the old and the disabled. They are also more environmentally friendly and economical to operate.

Pace Mr Saint, having the stairway of a double-decker bus immediately behind the driver of a front-entry vehicle is not impossible. The ones I drove in the area covering Bath, Bristol, Chippenham and their hinterlands during the 1980s and 1990s functioned perfectly well with this design. It is just a matter of getting used to it.

J.A. Bosworth
Cugy, Switzerland

Read anywhere with the London Review of Books app, available now from the App Store for Apple devices, Google Play for Android devices and Amazon for your Kindle Fire.

Sign up to our newsletter

For highlights from the latest issue, our archive and the blog, as well as news, events and exclusive promotions.