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Ich bin ein Belieber

Michael Herbert Miller: Ich bin ein Belieber, 21 March 2013

The Love Song of Jonny Valentine 
by Teddy Wayne.
Free Press, 285 pp., £24.95, February 2013, 978 1 4767 0585 9
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... to almost 70,000 retweets. It was only a matter of time before somebody wrote a novel about him. Teddy Wayne’s The Love Song of Jonny Valentine follows an 11-year-old Bieberlike entertainer on the last leg of his tour in support of his second album.* The novel’s epigraph is something Bieber told a reporter from Interview magazine in 2010: ‘I want ...

Wayne on a Warm Day

Duncan Campbell, 20 June 1996

Bad Business 
by Dick Hobbs.
Oxford, 140 pp., £14.99, November 1995, 0 19 825848 8
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... of Hobbs’s study were bowled over by the idea of being immortalised by an academic. Here’s Teddy’s response to a request for an interview: ‘You fucking come and see me, fucking write about me, you fucking long streak of fucking useless – Come and put this in a fucking book, fucking Professor fucking Thunderbirds Brains.’ But those who do comply ...

National Treasure

Christopher Hitchens, 14 November 1996

Jacqueline Bouvier: An Intimate Memoir 
by John Davis.
Wiley, 256 pp., £14.99, October 1996, 0 471 12945 3
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... Birmingham’s work to Kitty Kelly’s Jackie Oh! to Jackie Under My Skin by the Yale semiotician Wayne Koestenbaum. Specialist markets within the domain of Jackie studies include Camelot freaks, of course, but also the ‘gay icon’ sub-strain which places her next to Liz Taylor and Ava Gardner as a sympathiser of the truly, wistfully stylish.Mr Davis’s ...

I had no imagination

Christian Lorentzen: Gerald Murnane, 4 April 2019

Tamarisk Row 
by Gerald Murnane.
And Other Stories, 281 pp., £10, February 2019, 978 1 911508 36 6
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Border Districts 
by Gerald Murnane.
And Other Stories, 144 pp., £8.99, January 2019, 978 1 911508 38 0
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... Gerald Murnane​ was named after a racehorse. His father, Reginald, was a front man for Teddy Estershank, a professional punter who was banned from being a licensed trainer or registered owner of horses by racecourses around Melbourne. Estershank, an ‘evil genius’ according to Murnane, used friends like Reginald as dummy owners for the horses he bought, trained and bet on ...

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