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Marina Warner: The Flood

6 March 2014
... I face More of the epic would be discovered under the sand as time went on. In 1990 StephanieDalley added more lines to her edition from newly recovered pieces, but most of what’s left has probably been smashed in the course of the Iraq wars. It seems proper that a place of fire and dust, its ...

Whip, Spur and Lash

John Ray: The Epic of Gilgamesh

2 September 1999
The Epic of Gilgamesh: A New Translation 
by Andrew George.
Allen Lane, 225 pp., £20, March 1999, 0 7139 9196 8
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... Epics such as Gilgamesh must have been one of the ways in which Mesopotamian identity was created and expressed. There are several translations into English, notably those by Nancy Sandars and StephanieDalley. Sandars’s prose translation was recently accused of stodginess by no less a reviewer than the editor of the Times, which seems a little ironic. Dalley’s verse translation is compelling ...

Most Curious of Seas

Richard Fortey: Noah’s Flood

1 July 1999
Noah’s Flood: The New Scientific Discoveries about the Event that Changed History 
by William Ryan and Walter Pitman.
Simon and Schuster, 319 pp., £17.99, February 1999, 0 684 81052 2
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... read Gilgamesh I was reminded of Pliny’s account of the eruption of Vesuvius in AD 79 and wondered whether the description of black, darkened skies might prove consistent with a volcanic eruption. StephanieDalley, the doyenne of Akkadian scholars, reminded me, however, that there was no convincing evidence in Mesopotamia’s archaeological record of an event so widespread and catastrophic (the ...
8 November 1990
Myths from Mesopotamia: Creation, The Flood, Gilgamesh and Others 
by Stephanie Dalley.
Oxford, 360 pp., £35, November 1989, 0 19 814397 4
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The Epic of Gilgamesh 
by Maureen Gallery Kovacs.
Stanford, 122 pp., £29.50, August 1989, 0 8047 1589 0
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... But now let Utanapishtim and his wife become like us, the gods! Let Utanapishtim reside far away, at the Mouth of the Rivers.” They took us far away and settled us at the Mouth of the Rivers.’ StephanieDalley’s book (from which come the translations quoted elsewhere in this review) offers much more, and keeps clearly in view the needs of those who will want to investigate further; her ideal ...

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