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Something Rather Scandalous

Jean McNicol: The Loves of Rupert Brooke

19 October 2016
Rupert Brooke: Life, Death and Myth 
by Nigel Jones.
Head of Zeus, 588 pp., £12, April 2015, 978 1 78185 703 8
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Fatal Glamour: The Life of Rupert Brooke 
by Paul Delany.
McGill-Queen’s, 380 pp., £28.99, March​ 2015, 978 0 7735 4557 1
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The Second I Saw You: The True Love Story of Rupert Brooke and Phyllis Gardner 
by Lorna C. Beckett.
British Library, 216 pp., £16.99, April 2015, 978 0 7123 5792 0
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... members from the women’s colleges; most of those who would be counted as Neo-Pagans came from one of these groups. Several, like Justin Brooke, had been pupils at Bedales, which, progressive and co-educational, keen on camping and acting, represented an attempt to break away from the public school ethos encapsulated by Rugby. The group had its own rules, which Brooke recapitulated to Katherine ...

Heil Putain!

Lorna​ Scott Fox: Lydie Salvayre

26 January 2006
The Company of Ghosts 
by Lydie Salvayre, translated by Christopher Woodall.
Dalkey Archive, 184 pp., £7.99, January 2006, 1 56478 350 2
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... or pedantry fail to touch the agent of the law, she contemplates strangling her mother with a napkin, then titters in sympathy with her. It becomes apparent that the two women form a grotesquely co-dependent couple, stuck in a time-warp of terrors and hatreds caused by the Occupation and its unpunished crimes: René Bousquet, Pétain’s general secretary of police, whom Rose once made it her ...

Winter Facts

Lorna​ Sage

4 April 1996
Remake 
by Christine Brooke-Rose.
Carcanet, 172 pp., £9.95, February 1996, 1 85754 222 3
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... carry on the family ‘line’. ‘Forbidding but remarkable,’ said the Telegraph of Out, and Punch thought that the author was so sure of her new self that she must belong to the school of Samuel Beckett. In Remake it’s this wise child she celebrates, and indeed she mischievously cites – from Jenny Diski writing in the London Review of Books, as it happens – a witty mock-theory about the ...

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