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A Show of Heads

Carlos Fuentes

19 March 1987
I the Supreme 
by Augusto RoaBastos, translated by Helen Lane.
Faber, 433 pp., £9.95, March 1987, 0 571 14626 0
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... and varied wills of a wide variety of writers who included, if my recall is as good as that of Roa Bastos’s El Supremo, Roa Bastos himself, Argentina’s Julio Cortazar, Venezuela’s Miguel Otero Silva, Colombia’s Gabriel García Marquez, Cuba’s Alejo Carpentier, the Dominican Republic’s Juan Bosch and ...

Diary

Richard Gott: Paraguayan Power

21 February 2008
... well the claustrophobic atmosphere of 20th-century Paraguay. The country’s greatest novelist, Augusto RoaBastos, long exiled in France, wrote the definitive novel about a Latin American dictator, evoking the perversities of the Stroessner era. I the Supreme, published in 1974, was ostensibly a biography of José ...

Memories of a Skinny Girl

Michael Wood: Mario Vargas Llosa

9 May 2002
The Feast of the Goat 
by Mario Vargas Llosa, translated by Edith Grossman.
Faber, 404 pp., £16.99, March 2002, 0 571 20771 5
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The Decline and Fall of the Lettered City: Latin America in the Cold War 
by Jean Franco.
Harvard, 323 pp., £15.95, May 2002, 0 674 00842 1
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... into a magic mirror. Hence the tradition of dictator novels, a minor genre with major members: Augusto RoaBastos’s I the Supreme (1974), Alejo Carpentier’s Reasons of State (1974), Gabriel García Márquez’s Autumn of the Patriarch (1975), and now Mario Vargas Llosa’s The Feast of the Goat (2000). The time ...

Robinson’s Footprints

Richard Gott: Hugo Chávez and the Venezuelan Revolution

17 February 2000
... though visitors would occasionally complain of being robbed. I have eaten excellent fish at the road-side restaurants cantilevered over the beach. When the plane eventually comes in to land, it does so on a tiny ledge scraped out beneath the mountains, parallel to the shore, and you can sometimes catch a glimpse of the shantytowns climbing up the steep ...

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