Christine Brooke-Rose

Christine Brooke-Rose most recent novel, Verbivore, appeared this year from Carcanet.

Diary: Palimpsest Histories

Christine Brooke-Rose, 10 May 1990

A familiar notion is particularly well-expressed in Salman Rushdie’s novel Shame. The notion is that of history as itself a fiction; the expression is varied. ‘All stories,’ he says as intruding author, ‘are haunted by the ghosts of the stories they might have been.’ And elsewhere:

Christine Brooke-Rose, being in her eighties and suffering many intractable illnesses and disabilities, recognises that her life must be near its end. Since her retirement from the University of...

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Winter Facts

Lorna Sage, 4 April 1996

Christine Brooke-Rose’s story of how this new book came to be is that she set out to write about her life, and instead produced a kind of antibiography. It’s described in the...

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Textual Harassment

Nicolas Tredell, 7 November 1991

Nervousness and nostalgia mark these three novels. The nostalgia of Christine Brooke-Rose is, surprisingly, for a golden age of character in fiction; David Caute harks back to the Sixties and the...

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Really fantastic

A.D. Nuttall, 18 November 1982

If Christine Brooke-Rose had stayed in Oxford, instead of migrating to France, she might have been rather like Helen Gardner. Her new book is written with a crispness and a briskness which at...

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