« | Home | »

Wynne Godley

Tags:

Wynne Godley, who died last week, wrote half a dozen pieces for the LRB. ‘Saving Masud Khan’, published in 2001, was ‘the story of a disastrous encounter with psychoanalysis which severely blemished my middle years’. A year earlier, he wrote a piece about the fragility of the US economy in which he observed:

It seems fair to conclude, at a minimum, that the high level of debt now poses a risk.

And in 1992, he wrote presciently about the flaws in the Maastricht Treaty:

The central idea of the Maastricht Treaty is that the EC countries should move towards an economic and monetary union, with a single currency managed by an independent central bank. But how is the rest of economic policy to be run? As the treaty proposes no new institutions other than a European bank, its sponsors must suppose that nothing more is needed. But this could only be correct if modern economies were self-adjusting systems that didn’t need any management at all.

Comment on this post

Log in or register to post a comment.


  • Recent Posts

    RSS – posts

  • Contributors

  • Recent Comments

    • streetsj on Burning Injustices: The Tories seem to be behaving like football teams of old putting everyone behind the ball just to defend their lead. In this case obviously the lead ...
    • IPFreely on Burning Injustices: But it works, it works - in the sense that the voters (the tory ones ) will cheer and down another stiff one. She might not be Maggie but she's a dam'...
    • Ouessante on Post-Democratic Broadcasting: Nick Robinson was President of the Oxford University Conservative Association. Charitably, it shouldn't matter...but it does.
    • Peterson_the man with no name on Post-Democratic Broadcasting: The standard glib response to accusations of BBC bias is to point out that "left-wingers and right-wingers both think the BBC is biased against them, ...
    • Scaramouche on With Senegal’s Fishermen: In 2006, when the dangerous journeys by open pirogues to the Canaries were at their height, West Africa's traditional coastal fishing had been badly d...

    RSS – comments

  • Contact

  • Blog Archive

Advertisement Advertisement