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At Tate Modern

Peter Campbell: Good plain painting and men in shirt-sleeves

24 June 2004
... and noticed for themselves alone, show how a kid who wanted something more from life than life at home might see them. Foreign artists, photographers and film-makers in particular – Wim Wenders, RobertFrank – have a special liking for this aspect of the look of America. Hopper did it better. The images get stronger as he gets older. The pictures he made during early trips to Paris in the 1920s ...

Uncle of the Bomb

Steven Shapin: The Oppenheimer Brothers

23 September 2010
Something Incredibly Wonderful Happens: Frank​ Oppenheimer and The World He Made Up 
by K.C. Cole.
Houghton Mifflin, 439 pp., $27, August 2009, 978 0 15 100822 3
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... HUAC: Is your brother a member of the Communist Party? Robert Oppenheimer: He is not a member of the Communist Party, to the best of my knowledge. HUAC: Are you speaking as of the present time? Robert Oppenheimer: I am, sir. HUAC: Was he a member of the Communist Party in the past? Robert Oppenheimer: Mr Chairman, I will answer the questions you put to me. I ask you not to press these ...

At the Centre Pompidou

Jeremy Harding: Beat Generation

7 September 2016
... Corso, ‘There is No More Street Corner ...’, unpublished manuscript (1960) Jack Kerouac, ‘On the Road’ (original typescript, 1951) Jack Kerouac, ‘The Slouch Hat’ (c.1960) John Cohen, ‘RobertFrank, Alfred Leslie, Gregory Corso’ (1959) Wallace Berman, Untitled (Allen Ginsberg, c.1960)PreviousNext These names belong to the original small group of friends who met in New York in the early ...
24 May 1990
Innumeracy 
by John Allen Paulos.
135 pp., £12.95, November 1989, 0 670 83008 9
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The Culture of Print 
edited by Roger Chartier.
351 pp., £35, September 1989, 0 7456 0575 3
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Symbols of Ideal Life 
by Maren Stange.
Cambridge, 190 pp., £25, June 1989, 0 521 32441 6
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TheLines of My Hand 
by Robert Frank.
£30, September 1989, 0 436 16256 3
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... sustaining the myth that photography was unambiguous and true in the face of such successful manipulations as Steichen’s was also part of its undoing. Stange puts the work of the Swiss photographer RobertFrank at the end, and outside the narrative, of her story. He started on the travels which resulted in his bleak, grainy picture essay in book form, The Americans, in the late Fifties, at about the ...

At the Barbican

Liz Jobey: Strange and Familiar

1 June 2016
... the lightness or the precision of his best pictures. As with other photographers in this show, notably Garry Winogrand, what could be done with ease and subtlety at home was harder to achieve abroad. RobertFrank worked in Britain between 1951 and 1953. Born in Switzerland but based in New York, he was still half-hoping his pictures would appeal to a magazine like Life but at the same time he was trying ...

At Tate Britain

Peter Campbell: How We Are

5 July 2007
... was made less viable by the snapshot, and television compromised photojournalism’s claim to immediacy. Michals’s collage portrait of the Sterling Black and Whiters – Ansel Adams, Sally Mann, RobertFrank, Salgado and so on – shows us which reputations were overshadowed by the new high-art photography. At the Tate there are photographs from both camps. One odd effect of the high art/common ...
27 June 1991
Nothing if not critical 
by Robert​ Hughes.
Collins Harvill, 429 pp., £16, November 1990, 0 00 272075 2
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Frank​ Auerbach 
by Robert​ Hughes.
Thames and Hudson, 240 pp., £25, September 1990, 0 500 09211 7
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Figure and Abstraction in Contemporary Painting 
by Ronald Paulson.
Rutgers, 283 pp., $44.95, November 1990, 0 8135 1604 8
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... Eighties presented spectacle of almost unrelieved decadence, in which the ‘virtues’ of the Reagan era ruled. In this desert of greed, vanity and corruption one could always rely on the tonic of Robert Hughes pieces in Time and the New York Review of Books, now collected. He lays about him splendidly, not sparing any link in the chain that tethers artists to their time, from the studio to the ...

In Transit

Geoff Dyer: Garry Winogrand

20 June 2013
... canyons of midtown Manhattan into a white-water flow of people, rapids of entanglement giving way to pools of unexpected calm. But he wasn’t simply a New York photographer-novelist. Convinced that RobertFrank had missed out on the real story of America in the 1950s – the story of the suburbs – he made his way across the country, and his travels put him in an entirely different relation to ...

On Robert​ Silvers

Andrew O’Hagan: Remembering Robert​ Silvers

19 April 2017
... on New York. I’m not Irish and I’m not really at one with America, but I’ve always to some extent shared the romance of being a part of it in old New York. For me, the city didn’t just mean Frank Sinatra and Studio 54, it meant Alfred Kazin and Lionel Trilling, Lillian Hellman and Susan Sontag. I loved its papers, the swagger of the contributors, the New York intellectuals, with their ...

Boutique Faith

Jeremy Waldron: Against Free Speech

20 July 2006
Courting the Abyss: Free Speech and the Liberal Tradition 
by John Durham Peters.
Chicago, 309 pp., £18.50, April 2005, 0 226 66274 8
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... streets of Leamington Spa with posters depicting Britons of African ancestry as apes. He was charged under the Race Relations Act with inciting racial hatred. Leamington Spa at that time was home to Robert Relf, a leader of something called the ‘British Movement’, who had made a name for himself earlier in the 1970s by advertising his house for sale ‘to a white family only’. I don’t remember ...

Princess Diane

Penny Boumelha

21 February 1985
Diane Arbus: A Biography 
by Patricia Bosworth.
Heinemann, 367 pp., £14.95, January 1985, 0 434 08150 7
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Inside the Onion 
by Howard Nemerov.
Chicago, 63 pp., £8.45, April 1984, 0 226 57244 7
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... occasion into lists of names: ‘Opening night of the show it seemed as if everybody she knew in the art and photography worlds was there, including Emile de Antonio, Henry Geldzahler, Andy Warhol, RobertFrank, Walker Evans, Tom Hess, Lisette Model, Richard Avedon, Marvin Israel, and the pop art collectors Robert and Ethel Scull.’ Bosworth’s concentration on the sex-and-society aspect of her ...

Diary

Adam Shatz: Ornette Coleman

15 July 2015
... than ‘music’ or ‘jazz’, is telling. The search for new sounds was a passion he shared with other composers in the American maverick tradition, from Charles Ives, Cage and Morton Feldman to Robert Johnson, Jimi Hendrix and Sun Ra.The revolution that began at the Five Spot was part of the wider black freedom struggle, as well as an extension of an American philosophy of self-reliance and ...

Frank​ Auerbach’s London

T.J. Clark: Frank​ Auerbach

9 September 2015
... That marvellous line from Thomas Hardy’s ‘At the Railway Station’: ‘And the man in the handcuffs suddenly sang/With grimful glee …’ Frank Auerbach to William Feaver And the man in the handcuffs suddenly sang With grimful glee: ‘This life so free Is the thing for me!’ And the constable smiled, and said no word. Thomas Hardy, ‘At ...

At the Movies

Michael Wood: Scorsese

16 November 2006
The Departed 
directed by Martin Scorsese.
October 2006
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... lawyers, clerics and union leaders. But then the apparent political or moral point vanishes as soon as it appears, and everyone still wants to be a gangster. He is not exactly a tragic hero, as Robert Warshow once suggested in a famous essay, but he is an embodiment of rogue power, a Robin Hood without the sentimental interest in the poor. Actually, gangsters in movies are always giving things ...

A Hammer in His Hands

Frank​ Kermode: Lowell’s Letters

22 September 2005
The Letters of Robert​ Lowell 
edited by Saskia Hamilton.
Faber, 852 pp., £30, July 2005, 0 571 20204 7
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... Writing letters was not the work Robert Lowell thought himself born to do, but what with one thing and another – good friends, a lively mind, deep troubles – he wrote a great many of them, demonstrating at considerable length ‘the ...

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