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I will make you pay

Heribert Adam: Redeeming Winnie, 5 March 2020

The Resurrection of Winnie Mandela 
by Sisonke Msimang.
Jonathan Ball, 173 pp., £20, September 2018, 978 1 86842 955 4
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Truth, Lies and Alibis: A Winnie Mandela Story 
by Fred Bridgland.
Tafelberg, 311 pp., £25, October 2018, 978 0 624 08425 9
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... more than once or twice. In a revised edition of his 2003 novella The Cry of Winnie Mandela, Njabulo Ndebele observes that at a certain point the logic of oppression becomes indistinguishable from the logic of resistance, and that ‘resistance also displays a capacity for its own evil.’ If that remains unacknowledged, particularly by the younger ...

Afro-Fictions

Graham Hough, 3 July 1986

A Forest of Flowers 
by Ken Saro-Wiwa.
Saros International, 151 pp., £7.95, June 1986, 978 246 003 6
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Fools, and Other Stories 
by Njabulo Ndebele.
Longman, 280 pp., £2.95, June 1986, 0 582 78621 5
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Hungry Flames, and Other Black South African Stories 
edited by Mbulelo Mzamane.
Longman, 158 pp., £2.95, June 1986, 0 582 78590 1
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Coming to Birth 
by Marjorie Oludhe Macgoye.
Heinemann, 150 pp., £10.95, June 1986, 0 434 44028 0
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Contre-Jour: A Triptych after Pierre Bonnard 
by Gabriel Josipovici.
Carcanet, 137 pp., £8.95, May 1986, 0 85635 641 7
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The Seven Ages 
by Eva Figes.
Hamish Hamilton, 186 pp., £9.95, May 1986, 0 241 11874 3
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... Three African writers, from very different parts of the continent – Saro-Wiwa from Nigeria, Ndebele from South Africa, Macgoye from Kenya. My ignorance of all three regions being deep and extensive, I am obliged to accept these three books in great part as documentary reports, as information about unknown ways of life ...

One Long Scream

Jacqueline Rose: Trauma and Justice in South Africa, 23 May 2019

... Winnie Mandela has already been granted re-entry into a communal world, at least symbolically, in Njabulo Ndebele’s novel The Cry of Winnie Mandela (2003), in which she narrates her own story after four other women, each of them abandoned by their husband for a different reason, have offered their story to her. One of the men is a disappeared ...

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