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Lucian Freud

Nicholas Penny

31 March 1988
... The exhibition of LucianFreud’s paintings which has already been shown in Washington and Paris, and which moves on to Berlin in the spring, has been amplified at its current London showing with some works on paper – a ...
20 January 2005
... tyre iron by another driver             who wanted him to hurry up and pass the garbage truck.       Flesh fails and failure             is visited upon it. The book of Freud’s paintings       a brooding invitation, catalogue             of human suspension in time and today I think they’re an oil       and pigment howl ...
27 June 1991
Dance till the stars come down 
by Frances Spalding.
Hodder, 271 pp., £25, May 1991, 0 340 48555 8
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Keith Vaughan 
by Malcolm Yorke.
Constable, 288 pp., £25, October 1990, 0 09 469780 9
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... John Minton’s face is familiar – if not from the self-portrait now in the National Portrait Gallery, then from the likeness he commissioned from LucianFreud and bequeathed to the Royal College of Art. It is very long, large-eyed, hollow-cheeked, with a receding chin and dark tousled hair. Photographs suggest that the self-portrait is a better physical ...

At the National Portrait Gallery

Andrew O’Hagan: Lucian Freud

26 April 2012
... Titian’s Diana and Actaeon and Diana and Callisto were described by LucianFreud as ‘simply the most beautiful pictures in the world’. And not long ago, in an act of Alex Salmond-defying co-operation, the National Gallery of Scotland and the National Gallery of Great Britain ...

Diary

Lord Goodman: On Loving Lucian Freud

18 July 1985
... piece: that a very great artist – who has now in a sensationally short space of time become a very close friend – unexpectedly asked if I would like to be drawn by him. I refer, of course, to LucianFreud, the product of whose activity is to be seen on the cover of the London Review of Books. I do not think I hesitated for a moment when he asked me. I was flattered beyond words, and a more ...

Falling in love with Lucian

Colm Tóibín: Lucian Freud’s Outer Being

10 October 2019
The Lives of Lucian FreudYouth, 1922-68 
by William Feaver.
Bloomsbury, 680 pp., £35, September, 978 1 4088 5093 0
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... LucianFreud’s​ mother, Lucie, brought her three sons from Berlin to London in September 1933 when Lucian was almost 11. She was soon followed by her husband, Ernst, an architect and the youngest son of Sigmund Freud. Over the next five or six years, more members of the family, including Sigmund himself ...

At Tate Britain

Peter Campbell: Lucian Freud

25 July 2002
... Back in 1982, as we came out of a show of LucianFreud’s paintings at Anthony d’Offay’s gallery in Dering Street (it had not been a brief visit), a friend asked what I thought of the rat. ‘What rat?’ I went back inside. It was, of course, there ...

At Tate Britain

Peter Campbell: Michael Andrews

9 August 2001
... and provide a continuing test of another, direct, way of seeing. In English painting, even recent painting, an autobiographical engagement with people and places is common. You find it in the work of Freud, Bacon and Spencer. Freud’s interrogation of the flesh, both intimate and unloving; Bacon’s use of imagery which takes its force from a willingness to do violence to the look of friends and ...

Entitlement

Jenny Diski: Caroline Blackwood

18 October 2001
Dangerous Muse: A Life of Caroline Blackwood 
by Nancy Schoenberger.
Weidenfeld, 336 pp., £20, June 2001, 0 297 84101 7
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... of Blackwood’s conformity with her times, though it was frightfully fashionable in the early 1950s for the upper classes to mingle with louche artistic types – and, of course, vice versa. She met LucianFreud at a party given by Lady Rothermere. He was the beautiful untidy young man standing at the back next to Francis Bacon and booing loudly while everyone else clapped Princess Margaret’s ...

At the Royal Academy

Peter Campbell: Frank Auerbach

4 October 2001
... made from drawings done in the early, empty morning of streets and open spaces near his studio. This use of what is intimate and close-by as subject matter has contemporary resonances (Francis Bacon, LucianFreud) and historical ones (from Chardin’s studio-bound way of working to Cézanne’s Provençal landscape beat, and the dusty, unchanging workspaces of Giacometti and Morandi). The dedication of ...

At Tate Britain

Peter Campbell: Reynolds’s theatrical portraits

7 July 2005
... fed with gossip and news from a burgeoning press, recognised and relished. No painter today could do it. Photography has so far subdued the power of painting to embellish personality that when LucianFreud (who in his prices, subjects and reputation is the closest thing we have to a dominant face-painter of Reynolds’s calibre) paints the Queen (as Reynolds painted the Prince of Wales) or Kate ...

At Dulwich Picture Gallery

Peter Campbell: David Wilkie

31 October 2002
... not be ignored. Millais, whose stroke was not as fluent and agreeable as Wilkie’s, gave up Pre-Raphaelite detail and, like Wilkie, turned to the profitable business of portraiture. In our time LucianFreud found the shift from little brushes to big ones a relief. In Wilkie’s case the sheer effort and time which went into one detailed painting may have told, but a look at his early work invites ...

At the Royal Academy

Daniel Soar: Hockney

9 February 2012
... which reaches into all corners of the main floor of Burlington House, is pageantry on a grand scale. How much better about ourselves it makes us feel that our greatest living artist, now that LucianFreud is dead, is back from California to celebrate an undervisited corner of agricultural East Yorkshire and make it glorious. The exhibition is full of signs of proud Englishness, and of spring and ...

At Tate Britain (2)

Rosemary Hill: Kenneth Clark

2 July 2014
... tiny, fantastical detail of Robin Ironside and the receding golds and greens of an un-obvious Seurat, The Forest at Pontaubert. His preferences trace a line through English art from Gainsborough to LucianFreud, making a rather pointed detour round the Pre-Raphaelites but spending arguably too long in what he himself called the ‘virtuous fog’ of Bloomsbury, represented here by an Omega dinner ...

At the National Gallery

Julian Bell: Seduced by Art

3 January 2013
...  that they close in on the essence of the medium in their yearning to capture evidence of what’s unique and contingent. And yet surely that’s also the drive behind the finest paintings by LucianFreud. More frequently, the camera’s capacity to collect evidence disrupts whatever is painting-like about the image. Photos by Tina Barney, a portraitist of contemporary aristocracy, share space ...

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