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What Keynes really meant

Peter Clarke, 19 April 1984

The Collected Writings of John Maynard Keynes. Vol. XI: Economic Articles and Correspondence, Academic 
edited and translated by Donald Moggridge.
Macmillan/Cambridge, 607 pp., £22, June 1983, 0 333 10723 3
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Keynesian Economics: The Search for First Principles 
by Alan Coddington.
Allen and Unwin, 129 pp., £9.95, February 1983, 9780043303344
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Keynes’s Economics and the Theory of Value and Distribution 
edited by John Eatwell and Murray Milgate.
Duckworth, 294 pp., £24, October 1983, 0 7156 1688 9
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Capital and Employment: A Study of Keynes’s Economics 
by Murray Milgate.
Academic Press, 217 pp., £17, December 1982, 0 12 496250 5
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... which to fashion it lie ready to hand with the completion of the text of the Collected Writings of John Maynard Keynes. Now that we have Volumes XI and XII, dealing with his more technical activities as an economist, only the index volume remains to be published, as the coping stone of a notable editorial enterprise. It is very gratifying that Sir Austin ...

Starting up

Peter Clarke, 6 November 1986

The German Slump: Politics and Economics 1924-1936 
by Harold James.
Oxford, 469 pp., £30, March 1986, 0 19 821972 5
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The Making of Keynes’s General Theory 
by Richard Kahn.
Cambridge, 327 pp., £20, May 1984, 9780521253734
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Towards the Managed Economy: Keynes, the Treasury and the Fiscal Policy Debate of the 1930s 
by Roger Middleton.
Methuen, 244 pp., £25, September 1985, 0 416 35830 6
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Keynes and his Contemporaries 
edited by G.C. Harcourt.
Macmillan, 195 pp., £22.50, October 1985, 0 333 34687 4
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The Policy Consequences of John Maynard Keynes 
edited by Harold Wattel.
Macmillan, 157 pp., £29.50, April 1986, 0 333 41340 7
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... hapless Labour Government could not be expected to have foreseen or averted, much less mastered. John Maynard Keynes, by contrast, reached for a mechanical metaphor appropriate to the current state of the art. ‘We have magneto trouble,’ he wrote in December 1930. ‘How, then, can we start up again?’ Keynesian policies, at the time and ...

Diary

W.G. Runciman: Dining Out, 4 June 1998

... schoolboy could be the next prime minister doesn’t cross either of our minds. On the other hand, John Birt is suitably impressed when I tell him that I actually met the great Lord Reith on the day of his extraordinary speech in the House of Lords likening commercial broadcasting to the Black Death. It was as if I’d said to the present Chief of me Defence ...

What We’re about to Receive

Jeremy Harding: Food Insecurity, 13 May 2010

... So it comes as a bigger shock than the salmonella scare (Edwina Currie, 1988) or the BSE scare (John Selwyn Gummer, 1990) to hear the latest strand in the table talk: that the era of endless food is winding down. This belief is new. Until recently the discussion was largely about quality. Quantity and availability only entered the picture when we wondered ...

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