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Perpetual Sunshine

David Cannadine, 2 July 1981

The Gentleman’s Country House and its Plan, 1835-1914 
by Jill Franklin.
Routledge, 279 pp., £15.95, February 1981, 0 7100 0622 5
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... in the built form to broader social, economic and political developments over five centuries. Jill Franklin’s excellent book begins where Girouard left-off, and investigates in impressive detail the last phase of country-house building, which he was only able to survey in two rather breathless chapters. ‘To appreciate why Victorian and Edwardian ...

Diary

Peter Craven: On the Demidenko Affair, 16 November 1995

... was described by David Marr, Patrick White’s biographer, as ‘astonishingly talented’, and by Jill Kitson of the ABC as ‘a searingly truthful account of terrible wartime deeds that is also an imaginative work of extraordinary redemptive power’. Assuming, as we all did, that the novel was, unambiguously, Demidenko’s own work (grounded in family ...

For Australians only

Jill Roe, 18 February 1988

... Sydney, February 1938. Miles Franklin, aged 58, attends a sesquicentenary celebration at Government House for ‘distinguished women’. The legendary author of My Brilliant Career (1901) has every right to be there. Now back in Australia after nearly three decades of being away, the enfant terrible of Federation days has restored her name with a splendid pastoral saga, All that swagger (1936 ...

Diary

Christian Lorentzen: The Democratic Convention, 10 August 2016

... put many arguments against Trump to him, and suggested he vote for the Green Party candidate, Jill Stein, or not vote at all. He has nothing much to say about Trump except that he’s not a politician, and isn’t convinced by the case for voting for a lesser evil. ‘The suffering’, Noam Chomsky and John Halle wrote in June, that Trump’s ‘extremist ...

President Gore

Inigo Thomas: Gore Vidal, 10 May 2007

Point to Point Navigation: A Memoir, 1964-2006 
by Gore Vidal.
Little, Brown, 278 pp., £17.99, November 2006, 0 316 02727 8
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... Mediterranean stuff. Kurt Vonnegut, a house guest, had disappeared: his photographer wife, Jill Krementz, couldn’t find him anywhere on the eight acres of the Vidal estate. Vidal, who seemed to know something about Vonnegut his wife didn’t, presumed that Vonnegut only wanted for a while to be out of range of the marital camera. This was ...

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