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Frank Acknowledgments

J.J. Lee, 10 January 1991

Ulster: Conflict and Consent 
by Tom Wilson.
Blackwell, 330 pp., £9.95, June 1989, 0 631 17006 5
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Biting at the grave: The Irish Hunger Strikes and the Politics of Despair 
by Padraig O’Malley.
Blackstaff, 330 pp., £9.95, October 1990, 0 85640 453 5
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Politics in the Streets: The Origins of the Civil Rights Movement in Northern Ireland 
by Bob Purdie.
Blackstaff, 286 pp., £9.95, September 1990, 0 85640 437 3
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... Tom Wilson’s Ulster counts among the handful of truly distinguished analyses of the Ulster question. However many reservations a Nationalist may have about his assumptions, his text offers an admirable basis for constructive debate: this is one of those rare books about a tragic problem that one wishes were longer. Its superior quality brings us up starkly against the bleakness of the problem ...

What can the matter be?

Denis Donoghue, 5 April 1990

Ulster Politics: The Formative Years, 1868-86 
by B.M. Walker.
Ulster Historical Foundation/Institute of Irish Studies, 327 pp., £15, February 1990, 0 901905 40 2
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Ireland 1912-1985: Politics and Society 
by J.J. Lee.
Cambridge, 754 pp., £55, January 1990, 0 521 26648 3
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... for their campaign of violence. The Anglo-Irish Agreement provides the last chapter of J.J. Lee’s Ireland 1912-1985. The book was completed, I gather, in a mood of unwonted buoyancy on Lee’s part, his spirits temporarily lifted by what appeared an act of statesmanship by Thatcher and Fitzgerald. I don’t ...

A Short History of the Trump Family

Sidney Blumenthal: The First Family, 16 February 2017

... saw him towering among them, and they raised hands to him in worship.’ A tabloid journalist, Lee Sarason, generates a blizzard of propaganda and ghostwrites Windrip’s manifesto, Zero Hour: Over the Top, excerpts from which appear as chapter epigraphs. ‘In the little towns, ah, there is the abiding peace that I love, and that can never be disturbed by ...

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