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12 May 1994
The Undivided Universe: An Ontological Interpretation of Quantum Theory 
by David Bohm, translated by Basil Hiley.
Routledge, 397 pp., £25, October 1993, 0 415 06588 7
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Black Holes and Baby Universes, and Other Essays 
by Stephen Hawking.
Bantam, 182 pp., £16.99, October 1993, 0 593 03400 7
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... DavidBohm and Basil Hiley worked together for twenty years and between them developed a very unusual approach to quantum theory. Bohm died in 1992, but by then the book was almost complete. It is a magnificent monument to one of this century’s finest and most attractive minds. Painfully shy, and finding few fellow physicists ...

Syzygy

Galen Strawson: Brain Chic

25 March 2010
36 Arguments for the Existence of God 
by Rebecca Goldstein.
Atlantic, 402 pp., £12.99, March 2010, 978 1 84887 153 3
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... evolutionary energy behind this emotion), is widely held to have acquired descriptive details from two Princeton philosophers. Mallach, the physicist in Properties of Light, shares many ideas with DavidBohm. Klapper, who thinks ‘Goethe … settled for being a genius’ and could have gone further, has, like Bloom (Harold, not Allan), an eidetic memory. And if Goldstein is caught up in the erotics ...

Think like a neutron

Steven Shapin: Fermi’s Paradoxes

24 May 2018
The Last Man Who Knew Everything: The Life and Times of Enrico Fermi, Father of the Nuclear Age 
by David​ N. Schwartz.
Basic, 448 pp., £26.99, December 2017, 978 0 465 07292 7
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... job interview at Google or McKinsey, you can reasonably expect to be posed such questions as ‘How many golf balls can fit in a school bus?’ or ‘How much does the Empire State Building weigh?’ David Schwartz​ is a science policy expert with a background in physics. His father was the Nobel-winning physicist Melvin Schwartz, who met Fermi in the 1950s and passed on his admiration of the great ...

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