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John Sutherland, 14 June 1990

CounterBlasts No 10. The Monarchy: A Critique of Britain’s Favourite Fetish 
by Christopher Hitchens.
Chatto, 42 pp., £2.99, January 1990, 0 7011 3555 7
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The Prince 
by Celia Brayfield.
Chatto, 576 pp., £12.95, March 1990, 0 7011 3357 0
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The Maker’s Mark 
by Roy Hattersley.
Macmillan, 558 pp., £13.95, June 1990, 9780333470329
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A Time to Dance 
by Melvyn Bragg.
Hodder, 220 pp., £12.95, June 1990, 0 340 52911 3
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... Palace toys? Do we really want to? Probably not, if The Prince is anything to go by. As fiction Brayfield’s romance is as bad and overhyped as everyone says. But it will probably make a lot of money in the long run and will covertly be devoured by many of the people who now sneer at it. And for all its appallingness, The Prince discovers an ingenious way ...

Ruin it your own way

Susan Pedersen, 4 June 2020

Tastes of Honey: The Making of Shelagh Delaney and a Cultural Revolution 
by Selina Todd.
Chatto, 304 pp., £18.99, August 2019, 978 1 78474 082 5
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A Taste of Honey 
by Shelagh Delaney.
Methuen, 112 pp., £14.44, November 2019, 978 1 350 13495 9
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... produced ‘Shelagh Delaney’, a ‘Northern’ and ‘working-class’ writer. So it is that Celia Brayfield, introducing a new edition of A Taste of Honey, can write that Delaney had an ‘unstable childhood’, grew up in the ‘drawn-out desolation, disruption and austerity of the postwar decade’ and was ‘forced to move to so many schools she ...

The Ground Hostess

Francis Wyndham, 1 April 1983

... Racing Standard, in which I located the TV Guide on an unfamiliar page with a new photograph of Celia Brayfield. A young couple came into the pub, walking very close to each other. It was only when I noticed that they were holding white sticks that I understood that they were blind. They stood talking together happily for a while (I heard the man ...

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