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I Should Have Shrieked

Patricia Beer, 8 December 1994

John Betjeman: Letters, Vol. I, 1926-1951 
edited by Candida LycettGreen.
Methuen, 584 pp., £20, April 1994, 0 413 66950 5
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... shrieks of laughter. This condition was caused not by the poet himself but by the editor or Candida LycettGreen, his daughter, who seems to value nothing so much about her father as his ability to make people split their sides. She establishes that this was the way he first got on in the world. In his student ...

Happy Knack

Ian Sansom: Betjeman, 20 February 2003

John Betjeman: New Fame, New Love 
by Bevis Hillier.
Murray, 736 pp., £25, November 2002, 0 7195 5002 5
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... his own self-satisfaction may have made him a less than exemplary father, although his daughter, Candida LycettGreen, clearly adored him – of his relationship with Cavendish, she has written, ‘I found the situation completely without conflict’ – and her excellent editions of Betjeman’s Letters make a ...
The ‘Private Eye’ Story: The First 21 Years 
by Patrick Marnham.
Private Eye/Deutsch, 232 pp., £7.95, October 1982, 0 233 97509 8
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One for the Road: Further Letters of Denis Thatcher 
by Richard Ingrams and John Wells.
Private Eye/Deutsch, 80 pp., £2.50, October 1982, 9780233975115
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Sir James Goldsmith: The Man and the Myth 
by Geoffrey Wansell.
Fontana, 222 pp., £1.95, April 1982, 0 00 636503 5
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... once in the Times; Christopher Booker in the Spectator; Malcolm Muggeridge in the Daily Telegraph; Candida Lycett-Green (who was in love with Ingrams at Oxford, speaks adoringly of him in this book, and once worked for the Eye) in the Standard. Nor are the paper’s smallest private squabbles denied space in the ...

The Undesired Result

Gillian Darley: Betjeman’s bêtes noires, 31 March 2005

Betjeman: The Bonus of Laughter 
by Bevis Hillier.
Murray, 744 pp., £25, October 2004, 0 7195 6495 6
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... awful letter as ‘it’, and who was entirely estranged from him after university. His daughter, Candida LycettGreen, enjoyed a much happier and more reciprocally loving relationship with her father, managing to deal tactfully with the two women in his life. Elizabeth Cavendish is present throughout these pages, but ...

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