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Israel’s Caesar

Naomi Shepherd

26 November 1987
SharonAn Israeli Caesar 
by Uzi Benziman.
Robson, 276 pp., £12.95, September 1987, 9780860514343
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Sands of Sorrow: Israel’s Journey from Independence 
by Milton Viorst.
Tauris, 328 pp., £16.50, September 1987, 1 85043 064 0
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... ArielSharon is both hero and bogeyman: brilliant military tactician and rogue general, master both of the pre-emptive strike and of the cover-up, populist leader and – in the eyes of liberal Israelis – ...

Ingathering

Ilan Pappe: The Israeli election and the ‘demographic problem’

20 April 2006
... of all the Zionist parties during the recent Israeli election campaign contained policies which they claimed would counter the ‘demographic problem’ posed by the Palestinian presence in Israel. ArielSharon proposed the pull-out from Gaza as the best solution to it; the leaders of the Labour Party endorsed the wall because they believed it was the best way of limiting the number of Palestinians ...

The Disappointing Trajectory of Amir Peretz

Ilan Pappe: Will Peretz make a difference?

15 December 2005
... he has adopted can produce results that differ in any way from those produced by previous similar initiatives. But Peretz is unlikely to be the next prime minister of Israel. The polls predict that ArielSharon’s new venture, Kadima (‘Forward’), will have many more seats than Peretz’s Labour Party. The two could, and probably would, form a coalition government, if the centrist Shinui Party ...

The Boss Has Gone Crazy

Uri Avnery: Bush eyes up the Middle East

6 January 2005
... next phase. They want to establish subservient regimes everywhere (‘promoting democracy in the Middle East’), station permanent garrisons in the region, control the world’s oil market, and help ArielSharon to fulfil his plans. Bush can do pretty much as he pleases: Middle Eastern rulers have drawn this conclusion with impressive speed. Every one of them has rushed for cover in the nearest ...
24 January 1991
... handicap. Moshe Arens, an engineering professor of American origins whose reasonable manner masks unyielding nationalist convictions, moved from the Foreign Ministry to the Ministry of Defence. ArielSharon, chief architect of the Israeli invasion of Lebanon, was back at the centre of government as Minister of Housing. On the fringes of the government, but helping to set the tone, were two ...

The Fair Cop

Tom Leonard

7 July 2005
... sort of flicker and that was when I was talking about terrorism and how they all use the word terror now instead and I told him I noticed when the change first took place I said I remember it being ArielSharon how he kept saying terror terror terror terror fighting terror war on terror fighting terror war on terror all instead of terrorism and now the word’s over here and how this reminded me of ...
5 April 1990
Warrior: The Autobiography of Ariel​ Sharon 
by Ariel Sharon and David Chanoff.
Macdonald, 571 pp., £14.95, October 1989, 0 356 17960 5
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The Slopes of Lebanon 
by Amos Oz, translated by Maurie Goldberg-Bartura.
Chatto, 246 pp., £13.95, January 1990, 0 7011 3444 5
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From Beirut to Jerusalem 
by Thomas Friedman.
Collins, 541 pp., £15, March 1990, 0 00 215096 4
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Pity the nation: Lebanon at War 
by Robert Fisk.
Deutsch, 622 pp., £17.95, February 1990, 0 233 98516 6
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... 1982 was a critical time for the authors of all four of these books. It was the year of ArielSharon’s most sanguinary foreign venture, which ended in massacre, failure, and a measure of disgrace. For the Israeli novelist Amos Oz, it was the year ‘the Land of Israel’ died in Lebanon, while for ...

Very Active Defence

Peter Lagerquist: Private Defence

19 September 2002
... firms are run by former members of Israel’s military and security agencies. The Government began to subsidise private security for settlers in the recently occupied West Bank and Gaza in the 1970s. ArielSharon supported the policy and funnelled funds through the Israeli Ministry of Housing, of which he was then head. At the time, Chaim Oron, a Knesset representative for the leftist Meretz Party ...

Next to Israel, not in place of it

Uri Avnery: What is to be done?

8 March 2007
... difficult for Israel to continue to refuse to negotiate. Arafat was always described as a terrorist. But Mahmoud Abbas was universally accepted as someone who wanted to achieve peace. Nevertheless, ArielSharon succeeded in avoiding any negotiations with him. The Gaza disengagement plan, which had Washington’s full support, served this end. But then Sharon suffered his stroke, and things might have ...

In Upper Nazareth

Ilan Pappe: ‘Judaisation’

10 September 2009
... continuity between Palestinian villages by driving Jewish wedges between them. The Jews came, but the Palestinians did not leave, so a second wave of Judaisation began in 2001, under Peres and ArielSharon. This wasn’t very successful either; Jews preferred to live in Tel Aviv. The present attempt is motivated by the failure of the previous policies to make the Galilee in general, and Nazareth in ...

Short Cuts

Yonatan Mendel: Uri Avnery

13 September 2018
... Palestine in 1933 following the Nazis’ rise to power, he wanted, like many others at the time, to find a new name to suit his new identity. He first considered Yosef (after his grandfather), then Ariel, but finally settled on Uri. In 1941, after his brother Werner, a volunteer in the British army, died on the Eritrean front, he chose Avnery as a Hebrew-sounding surname for its resemblance to his ...

The Great Middle East Peace Process Scam

Henry Siegman: There Is No Peace Process

16 August 2007
... retain the Jordan Valley and other parts of the West Bank. Anyone familiar with Israel’s relentless confiscations of Palestinian territory – based on a plan devised, overseen and implemented by ArielSharon – knows that the objective of its settlement enterprise in the West Bank has been largely achieved. Gaza, the evacuation of whose settlements was so naively hailed by the international ...

Short Cuts

Jeremy Harding: Milosevic is delivered to the Hague

19 July 2001
... The other question is whether Milosevic’s trial will bring us any closer to the day when an International Criminal Court can arrange for the appearance of Henry Kissinger, say, or Jonas Savimbi, or ArielSharon, after drawing up the rather straightforward indictments in each case. That’s interesting, too. Indeed, it’s one of the big questions. It can be put in order to discredit the process in ...

Short Cuts

Eyal Weizman: The Book of Destruction

6 December 2012
... of the colonial power even when the colonist is nowhere to be seen. Before it withdrew from Gaza in 2005, Israel demonstrated its control over the enclave by means of its settlements. (In 1980, ArielSharon, then minister in charge of the settlements, said he wanted ‘the Arabs to see Jewish lights every night no more than five hundred metres away’.) After the military relocated to the Strip ...

Israel’s Message

Ilan Pappe: Gaza

14 January 2009
... with the brutality it uses against purely Palestinian targets. So the settlers were removed, not as part of a unilateral peace process as many argued at the time (to the point of suggesting that ArielSharon be awarded the Nobel peace prize), but rather to facilitate any subsequent military action against the Gaza Strip and to consolidate control of the West Bank. After the disengagement from Gaza ...

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