Ruth Richardson

Ruth Richardson author of Death, Dissection and the Destitute, teaches at the Institute of Historical Research in London.

Mansions in Bloom

Ruth Richardson, 23 May 1991

The garden whose pleasures and plenty are described in A Paradise out of a Common Field is neither typical nor representative. Its owner is extremely rich, and its location a Victorian form of Arcadia: a place where money is no object, where all the world is the topmost Society, and where the servant class knows its place. Perhaps because this flawless corner of Victoria’s England is so very unlike what we know of it from Dickens and Mayhew, George Eliot and Mrs Gaskell, it seems rather an unreal landscape.

So Very Silent: Victorian Corpse Trade

John Pemble, 25 October 2012

The last year of the workhouse was 1929. The old-age pension, introduced twenty years earlier, was still only ten shillings a week. George Orwell hadn’t imagined that anyone could live on...

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Esprit de Corps

Roy Porter, 21 January 1988

Can any profession be more altruistic and noble than medicine? It comes as rather a scandalous suggestion that doctors may themselves be sick. Not just overworked and exhausted, and statistically...

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