LRB Winter Lectures 2015

The London Review of Books Winter Lectures 2016 are presented in association with the British Museum.

Robin Hood in a Time of Austerity

James Meek

James Meek


Friday 29 January, 18.30
BP Lecture Theatre, British Museum

James Meek’s lecture is now sold out.

The Robin Hood legend is the first political fable we learn: a heroic outlaw steals from the rich to give to the poor.  Even now, the popular language of democratic politics still evokes the notion of classes robbing each other. James Meek asks how, in a time of austerity economics, we define the robber, and the robbed?

James Meek is a novelist, journalist and the winner of the 2015 Orwell Prize for his critique of privatisation, Private Island.

Borders

Frances Stonor-Saunders

Frances Stonor Saunders

Friday 5 February, 18.30
BP Lecture Theatre, British Museum

Frances Stonor Saunders’s lecture is now sold out.

Globalisation promised a borderless world, but it has delivered an age of neurotically policed zones and cubicles. To cross a border legally now involves an unprecedented level of scrutiny: fingerprint and iris scans, chips embedded in your passport, hidden sensors to detect your heartbeat and carbon dioxide emissions from thirty feet away, the tick-box confessional of ‘Are you now or have you ever been . . .' Frances Stonor Saunders inspects the complex apparatus of today’s border regimes and their obsession with the verified self.

Frances Stonor Saunders’s most recent book is The Woman who Shot Mussolini. She is a historian, journalist and broadcaster.

To purchase tickets click here or call +44 (0)20 7323 8181 – The Ticket Desk in the Great Court of the British Museum is open from 10.00 to 16.45 daily. The ticket prices are £10 (£8 concessions including LRB subscribers and Friends of the British Museum).

The 1916 Rebellion

Colm Tóibín

Colm Tóibín

Thursday 24 March, 18.30
BP Lecture Theatre, British Museum

Colm Tóibín’s lecture is now sold out but tickets have just been released for a live video relay in the Stevenson Lecture Theatre at £5 or £3 concessions.

The slow movement of Patrick Pearse – poet, educationalist and language-enthusiast – from cultural nationalism towards separatism and bloody revolution, is one of the reasons the 1916 Rebellion took place and had such influence. Colm Tóibín traces his politics, in all their complexity and ambiguity, during the decade which led to the Rebellion, which in turn helped lead towards Irish independence.

Colm Tóibín, author of the Booker-shortlisted novels The Master and The Testament of Mary and the Costa-winning Brooklyn, teaches at Columbia.

To purchase tickets click here or call +44 (0)20 7323 8181 – The Ticket Desk in the Great Court of the British Museum is open from 10.00 to 16.45 daily. The ticket prices are £10 (£8 concessions including LRB subscribers and Friends of the British Museum).