Law and Class

Francis Bennion

  • Respectable Rebels edited by Roger King
    Hodder, 200 pp, £10.95, October 1979, ISBN 0 340 23164 5
  • The Judge by Patrick Devlin
    Oxford, 207 pp, £7.50, September 1979, ISBN 0 19 215949 6
  • Human Rights edited by F.E. Dowrick
    Saxon House, 223 pp, £9.70, July 1979, ISBN 0 566 00281 7
  • In on the Act by Sir Harold Kent
    Macmillan, 273 pp, £8.95, September 1979, ISBN 0 333 27120 3
  • Law, Justice and Social Policy by Rosalind Brooke
    Croom Helm, 136 pp, £7.95, October 1979, ISBN 0 85664 636 9
  • Inequality, Crime and Public Policy by John Braithwaite
    Routledge, 332 pp, £10.75, November 1979, ISBN 0 7100 0323 4

Roger King and Neill Nugent assemble material by which they seek to persuade us that there is such a thing as the middle class, and that in the 1970s, by use of legal process, it staged a revolt. For example, entrepreneurs and high taxpayers fought under the banner of NAFF (later changed to the Freedom Association to avoid confusion with the National Front). Middle-class evangelists used law to close the eyes of the citizenry, and block their ears.

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