« | Home | »

The Price of a Cinema Ticket


At the beginning of the year a group of workers at the Curzon cinema chain joined BECTU, the media and entertainment union. Front-of-house workers at Curzon are employed on zero-hour contracts, meaning that they have no guaranteed earnings week by week. If they’re offered no work, they earn no money.

By August, almost half of all non-management Curzon staff had joined BECTU. They filed papers with the Central Arbitration Committee and gathered 108 signatures – representing 70 per cent of the workforce – on a petition asking Curzon to recognise BECTU for the purposes of collective bargaining. Management refused to listen.

The workers are campaigning for the reintroduction of ticket concessions for cinemagoers, more secure contracts and higher wages. Most earn £7 an hour. The London Living Wage is £8.80. A ticket to see a film at the Curzon Soho after 5 p.m. on a weekday is £13.75. Curzon have refused to recognise the union, saying that the company would set up an ‘official forum for employees to feedback their concerns to senior staff’ instead.

Curzon aren’t the only cinema group to exploit their workers in this way. The Everyman chain also employs all non-management staff on zero-hour contracts. One of them told me that in slow weeks managers would routinely be asked to send workers home to keep costs down. ‘That’s the nightmare scenario for zero-hour workers.’ he said. ‘There are people for whom the flexibility is good. The injustice is that they’re imposing it on people from above, all over the workforce.’

Today the Curzon Workers Party organised a communication blockade, asking people to bombard Curzon head office with emails, tweets and phone calls to ask the management why they wouldn’t voluntarily recognise the union. The protest was due to take place tomorrow, but Curzon head office decided to close for the day, so the campaign began this morning instead.

I’ve spent the afternoon emailing Philip Knatchbull, the CEO of Curzon, to ask him why he wouldn’t recognise the workers’ union. So far, he hasn’t emailed me back. @CurzonCinemas hasn’t been responding to tweets. Earlier I called all the numbers listed on the Facebook page, but my calls went unanswered. When I tried again later, the phones were engaged. The blockade runs until 6 p.m.

Comments on “The Price of a Cinema Ticket”

  1. Thomas Jones says:

    An email from Curzon:

    In reply to Jon Day’s article – our CEO is not called Frank Knatchbull and our cinema employees are not paid £6 per hour. That would be beneath the minimum wage! We are not a minimum wage employer either.

    We are talking to BECTU about recognition and should have news soon. We have also made it clear that of course we do agree with the London Living Wage, but that we are operating at break even as a group – this would tip is into loss. We’re investigating ideas on this front.

    Philip Knatchbull is now called by his name: apologies for that, sloppy editing.

    Jon Day says ‘around £6 an hour’. The national minimum wage is £6.31. The Curzon Workers Party say they’re on £6.62.

    • Thomas Jones says:

      And an email from the Curzon workers:

      We get accrued holiday pay and we get sick pay… We used to earn £6.62 an hour but about a month ago we got 0.38p raise. It’s now £7 an hour.

      The post has been amended accordingly. We’ll endeavour to be more accurate in future.

Comment on this post

Log in or register to post a comment.

  • Recent Posts

    RSS – posts

  • Contributors

  • Recent Comments

    • Neil Kitson on Unwinnable War Two: There is no Chapter VII support for military action in Resolution 2249.
    • pinkycubin on Unwinnable War Two: Streetsj, It is obvious there is no clear 'solution'. That doesn't therefore mean that the use of ordnance dropped from height is part of the answ...
    • soadenubi on Being Lord Lugard: As a Nigerian normally resident in Lagos, I found the blog:Being Lord Lugard a most interesting read. This note is primarily a request that the Autho...
    • streetsj on Unwinnable War Two: Yes. So what's your solution? A negotiated settlement of peace for everyone. And who would disagree - but realistically what is the answer? One thing...
    • streetsj on What does Osborne want?: I have thought since 2010 that much of the most austere rhetoric has been directed at the financial markets. Meanwhile reality is very different as pu...

    RSS – comments

  • Contact

  • Blog Archive

  • From the LRB Archive

    Edward Said: The Iraq War
    17 April 2003

    ‘This is the most reckless war in modern times. It is all about imperial arrogance unschooled in worldliness, unfettered either by competence or experience, undeterred by history or human complexity, unrepentant in its violence and the cruelty of its technology.’

    David Runciman:
    The Politics of Good Intentions
    8 May 2003

    ‘One of the things that unites all critics of Blair’s war in Iraq, whether from the Left or the Right, is that they are sick of the sound of Blair trumpeting the purity of his purpose, when what matters is the consequences of his actions.’

    Simon Wren-Lewis: The Austerity Con
    19 February 2015

    ‘How did a policy that makes so little sense to economists come to be seen by so many people as inevitable?’

    Hugh Roberts: The Hijackers
    16 July 2015

    ‘American intelligence saw Islamic State coming and was not only relaxed about the prospect but, it appears, positively interested in it.’

Advertisement Advertisement