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At the National Gallery

Charles Hope: ‘Titian’s First Masterpiece’

24 May 2012
... The small exhibition at the National Gallery entitled Titian’s First Masterpiece: ‘The Flight into Egypt’, open until 19 August, is centred on a large canvas from the Hermitage. The picture has not been much discussed by scholars. This is partly because ...

A Wonder and a Scandal

Peter Campbell: Titian

5 April 2001
TitianThe Complete Paintings 
by Filippo Pedrocco and Maria Agnese Chiari Moreto Weil.
Thames and Hudson, 336 pp., £50, March 2001, 0 500 09297 4
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... If you are willing to define what you mean by it, the idea of progress in the arts is useful. Take Titian’s portraits. Whether or not those who first saw them understood that a new way of recording likeness was evolving, that way would define the technical ambitions of European portrait painting until ...

Not very good at drawing

Nicholas Penny: Titian

6 June 2013
TitianHis Life 
by Sheila Hale.
Harper, 832 pp., £30, July 2012, 978 0 00 717582 6
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... Titian: His Life is – not surprisingly, considering its great length – really about Titian’s ‘life and times’, and often seems to be more about the latter than the former. Even when we meet with a fact about the artist (and there are a good many new ones here) – it may be about the ...

At the National Gallery

Peter Campbell: Titian

6 March 2003
... The painting A Man with a Quilted Sleeve in the Titian exhibition at the National Gallery (until 18 May) makes sense as a self-portrait. The bearded young man looks over his shoulder towards you as an artist would who had turned from canvas to mirror ...

At the Royal Scottish Academy

Nicholas Penny: The Age of Titian

21 October 2004
... pleasures provided by the permanent collections, it is appropriate that its rather gross architecture stands in front of the more reticent and elegant home of the parent institution. But The Age of Titian, an exhibition devoted to Venetian Renaissance art mainly from Scottish collections, is so well conceived and displayed that it disarms those of us who trembled at the prospect of change to the ...

Titian’s Mythologies

Thomas Puttfarken

2 April 1981
Titian 
by Charles Hope.
Jupiter Books, 170 pp., £12.50, June 1980, 0 906379 09 1
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... If Titian’s reputation were to be assessed by the number and quality of the monographs devoted to him during this century, it would be hard to believe that he was one of the greatest painters of European art ...

At the Royal Academy

Charles Hope: Giorgione

30 March 2016
... Giovanni Morelli claimed in 1880 was a picture once in the Marcello collection in Venice. According to Michiel the landscape and a figure of Cupid (eliminated by a restorer in 1843) were by Titian. The same picture had been described in 1648 by the Venetian writer Carlo Ridolfi, who added that Cupid was shown holding a bird. Morelli’s identification, his apparent ability to recognise a ...

Human Stuff

Lawrence Gowing

2 February 1984
... with a pipe (sheep were herded to the flute in Venetian painting) walked though a darkening farmyard towards the mountains. The Pastoral Concert must have been inspired by Giorgione, even though Titian painted the picture (in the Louvre). In mid-century (and often in this exhibition) the concert reassembles to celebrate erotic delight and fate. In one print the band is conducted by an écorché ...

At the Royal Academy

Charles Hope: Giovanni Battista Moroni

8 January 2015
... with paintings from the past. No one would suppose that portraits by Van Dyck or Reynolds are other than flattering, but they are considered beautiful none the less; and the same is true of those by Titian, who managed to make the rulers he painted uniformly handsome, confident, authoritative and benign, but in ways that seem entirely convincing and unstrained. ‘Portrait of Bernardo Spini’ and ...

Measuring up

Nicholas Penny

4 April 1991
Renaissance Portraits: European Portrait Painting in the 14th, 15th and 16th Centuries 
by Lorne Campbell.
Yale, 290 pp., £35, May 1990, 0 300 04675 8
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... in portraits by Memling, was imitated in Italy. Indeed, the Mona Lisa (although, surprisingly, he doesn’t mention this) originally included such columns. He also connects this convention with Titian’s use of asymmetrical columns and pilasters of huge proportions. But this is surely completely different and was suggested to Titian by the massive columns he had deployed as part of the palatial ...

King Cling

Julian Bell: Kings and Collectors

5 April 2018
Charles I: King and Collector 
Royal Academy, London, until 15 April 2018Show More
Charles II: Art and Power 
Queen’s Gallery/London, until 13 May 2018Show More
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... a Christian dramatist as any Italian. The negative space between Holbein’s risen Jesus and his Magdalen is as agonising as that in the National Gallery’s better-known canvas on the same theme by Titian. Titian​ is effectively the backbone of Caroline art history, to the extent, that is, that any theme can be said to have informed the big grab that came away with some ingratiating Correggios, some ...

Made in Venice

Charles Hope

2 April 1981
Andrea Schiavone 
by Francis Richardson.
Oxford, 225 pp., £30, April 1980, 0 19 817332 6
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... but virtually all of them, as contemporaries everywhere recognised, reflected a distinctive local tradition whose best representatives were among the outstanding artists of their day. Titian, Tintoretto and Veronese, for example, were all active when Sansovino was writing: at that time nowhere else in Italy could boast of a group of painters of comparable stature. But not only have ...

At the National Gallery

Peter Campbell: Rembrandt

17 August 2006
... is quite different and arises from Rembrandt’s inability to depersonalise figures – a wonderful, stubborn refusal to bow to the archetype. One is an intruder on privacy as one never is with a Titian or a Rubens nude. It is possible that Bathsheba’s pose is based on a piece of classical statuary that Rembrandt could have known from an engraving; this may explain why, although it is a greater ...

In Lille

Peter Campbell: Rubens

1 April 2004
... Arts in Lille (until 14 June). In the more striking of the two, which lives in Lille, Christ is pale, elegant, perfectly muscled, sculptural. Compare this version of the dead body with the body in Titian’s late Entombment in the Prado. Titian’s Christ looks older. His heavily muscled arm can also be compared to antique sculpture. But where Rubens suggests a sleeping Apollo, Titian brings to mind ...

At the National Gallery

Peter Campbell: Renaissance Faces

6 November 2008
... There are something under a hundred pictures, and more than a hundred faces, in Renaissance Faces: Van Eyck to Titian, at the National Gallery until 18 January. Some of the pictures stick firmly to the facts: the line of a nose, the jut of a chin, the texture of stuffs and fur, the shine of gold. Others adjust ...

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