« | Home | »

Universities under Attack

Tags: |

Saturday 26 November at 10 a.m.
Venue: Edmond J Safra Lecture Theatre, King’s College London

The Research Assessment Exercise, corporate sponsorship, ‘impact’, the Browne Report, a 200 per cent increase in tuition fees, the introduction of private universities, budget cuts: we are living through a period of rapid and sweeping change in higher education. Where will the changes leave us, and what higher education come to look like? What do the changes mean for our idea of the university?

‘Universities under Attack’ gathers an array of speakers to discuss the state of higher education and to address the most urgent question of all: how should we respond?

This event is free and open to all, but space is limited – you can reserve your place here.

Programme:

  • 10 a.m. ‘What Kind of University?’
    Stefan Collini (Cambridge), Tim Horder (editor, Oxford Magazine), Peter Scott (Institute of Education).
  • 11.30 a.m. Coffee
  • 12 p.m. ‘Universities in a Corporate World’. 
    Simon Head (Oxford and New York University), Howard Hotson (Oxford), Michael Wood (Princeton).
  • 1.30 p.m. Lunch
  • 2.30 p.m. ‘Academic Labour as a Factor of Production: Hefce and Research Assessment’.
    Matthew Feldman (Northampton), Rachel Malik (formerly of Middlesex University), Paola Mattei (Oxford), Ann Mroz (editor, Times Higher Education).
  • 4 p.m. Coffee
  • 4.30 p.m. ‘Beyond the White Paper: What Is to Be Done?’
    Terence Kealey (Buckingham), Keith Thomas (Oxford), Susan Wright (University of Aarhus).

Comments on “Universities under Attack”

  1. yudmarais says:

    It’s particularly appropriate that this event is taking place at King’s College, London. This was the scene in 2010 of a large scale attempt by management, one of whose senior figures was an ex-BP executive, to establish the practice that British academics are not tenured. This attempt was fought off eventually, though with some high profile casualties, as documented on these pages and on his blog by Iain Pears. The Labour government rewarded the Principal with a knighthood.

  2. ander says:

    Where will the changes leave us, and what higher education come to look like, you ask? Look no farther than at British Rail.

  3. Christian says:

    Those nearer to Leeds than London might be interested in a similar event ‘Re-imagining the University’ organised on the same day (Saturday 26 November) at Leeds Metropolitan University (Lecture Theatre 2, Leslie Silver Building) from 10.30 to 5pm by Leeds Education Activist Network. Speakers include Prof Mike Neary (University of Lincoln), Dr. Sarah Amsler (Campaign for the Public University) and Mark Bergfeld (NUS NEC) plus speakers from education unions striking on November 30 – for more info please contact LeedsEAN@gmail.com or go to here

Comment on this post

Log in or register to post a comment.


  • Recent Posts

    RSS – posts

  • Contributors

  • Recent Comments

    • Harry Stopes on Trump, #takeaknee and American History: The response to James McClean, a West Brom player from Derry who refuses to wear the poppy on his shirt during October/ November (like the parading of...
    • Thomas Jones on Glen Newey 1961-2017: A message from Glen Newey's family: We are asking for contributions from Glen’s friends, colleagues and students around the world in the hope of ...
    • shosha shuldeiner on The Conventional Mr Hefner: I think the answer to your query as to why has the adjective 'conventional' been attached to Mr. Hefner's description, lies in the the observation of ...
    • Jeremy Bernstein on The Conventional Mr Hefner: I had one encounter with Playboy. I had written a profile of Stanley Kubrick for the New Yorker that centered on chess. I was visiting Oxford and was ...
    • RobotBoy on ‘This Bankrupt Island’: Around five million Puerto Ricans (and those of PR descent) live on the U.S. mainland - more than on the island. There are over 700,000 Puerto Ricans ...

    RSS – comments

  • Contact

  • Blog Archive

Advertisement Advertisement