Privacy

The London Review of Books (LRB) has created this statement to demonstrate our commitment to your privacy, to explain how we collect information and to explain how we use the information we collect about our web site users.

If you have any questions about this privacy statement please address them to registrar@lrb.co.uk


Scope

This privacy statement refers to the London Review of Books and the London Review Bookshop Website (www.lrb.co.uk – hereafter ‘LRB web site’) and does not necessarily reflect the use of data gathered on subscribers to the print edition of the London Review of Books or those who have taken advantage of London Review of Books advertising promotions unrelated to the LRB Web site.

This statement is subject to change at any time. The way we use any information will be subject to the privacy statement that is current when that information is gathered. Please check this page regularly to see any changes.

How we collect and use information

Cookies

Cookies are short strings of text sent to your browser and stored by your computer. Most commercial web sites use cookies. We use cookies to remember your preferences and to reference information about the time and extent of your use of the LRB Website. We use this information for purposes of system administration and to track potential abuse of our terms and conditions of use. We also use this information in an aggregated form for purposes of marketing and as information to potential advertisers and subscribers. We do not use this information in any way that is personally identifying.

We also use cookies for authentication and to remember the logged-in status of registered users and subscribers who use our extended subscriber services.

Most browsers have ‘preference’ settings which alert you when cookies are being received and allow you to reject them before they are stored or delete them after they have been stored. If you choose to reject cookies you will still be able to use the LRB Website, but functionality may be reduced and subscribers may be unable to use our extended subscriber services or view subscriber-only content.

IP address

Your IP address is a numeric code which is assigned to your computer every time you connect to the internet. Typically for home users it will not identify your computer exactly but will identify the service provider via whom you connect to the internet. We use aggregated IP address information to compile reports on the demographics of the usage of the LRB Website for purposes of system adminstration, marketing, as information to potential advertisers and subscribers, and to track potential abuse of our terms and conditions of use. We do not use IP address information in a form that is personally identifiable except where the users of that IP address have been responsible for violation of our terms and conditions of use.

Subscriptions, sales and other services

When you use the LRB Website to subscribe to the London Review of Books magazine or for a web subscription, to purchase goods and services, or to update your subscription data, we will need you to provide certain information which enables you to be identified as an individual (name, address, e-mail, credit card details, and so on). This information is necessary for us to process your order or update your details. We may associate information referenced by cookies with personal information which you provide to us online. We will not disclose your personal information to third parties except in the following cases:

(1) When it is necessary to provide you with a service you have requested.

(2) Under circumstances required by law: when we believe in good faith that a law or legal process requires it or where we believe disclosure is necessary to protect or enforce our rights, the rights of our contributors whose copyright material is under our control, or the rights of other users of the LRB Website whose personal information is under our control.

Newsletter and information sign up

If you sign up for any newsletter we might offer on the LRB Website we will hold your e-mail address securely in a list. We will make sure that each newsletter carries information about how to opt out of the list and how to remove your name from the list so that you will be able to choose to stop receiving the newsletter at any time if you so wish.

Public Forums

In the future we may make chat rooms, forums, message boards, and/or news groups available to users of the LRB Website. Please remember that any information that is disclosed in these areas becomes public information and you should exercise caution when deciding to disclose your personal information. Your participation in any public forum which we provide is subject to the LRB’s terms and conditions of use.

Advertisers and commercial associates

The LRB Website contains advertisements and promotional links to web sites operated by third parties. While we would never knowingly link to a site which we believed to be trading in bad faith, the LRB is not responsible for the content of these web sites and we take no responsibility for the content, privacy practices, goods or services offered by these sites. Specific provisions in the LRB Website’s terms and conditions of use apply to the content of all advertisements and access to all promotional linked web sites.

Contextual links

Articles on the LRB Website sometimes contain links to third party web sites. These links, provided by contributors to the LRB, are provided on a contextual basis and are relevant to the essays in which they appear. The London Review of Books is not responsible for the content, business practices or privacy practices of such web sites. Specific provisions in the LRB Website’s terms and conditions of use apply to use of these links.

Security

The LRB Website uses SSL (secure socket layer) encryption for all financial transactions (e.g. subscribing to the LRB using our online service, purchases from the London Review Bookshop). All data we collect about users of the LRB Website is similarly protected.

Accepting this privacy statement

By using the LRB Website you signify your acceptance of this privacy statement and our terms and conditions of use. If you do not agree, or are not comfortable with any policy in this statement, your only remedy is to not use the LRB Website. If you are concerned about any cookies which have already been issued to you by the LRB Website, you can delete cookies served to your browser by the servers at “lrb.co.uk”, “www.lrb.co.uk”, “lrbshop.co.uk” and “www.lrbshop.co.uk”.

If this privacy statement is not accepted in full, use of the LRB Website must be terminated immediately.

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  • From the LRB Archive

    Chris Lehmann: The Candidates
    18 June 2015

    ‘Every one of the Republican candidates can be described as a full-blown adult failure. These are people who, in most cases, have been granted virtually every imaginable advantage on the road to success, and managed nevertheless to foul things up along the way.’

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    10 May 2007

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