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One Hard Bastard

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Just in from Cape, an advance proof copy of The Twelve Children of Paris, the second part of Tim Willocks’s Mattias Tannhauser trilogy (out in May). The novel opens on St Bartholomew’s Eve 1572. We especially look forward to reading about the ‘de-limbings’.

One Hard Bastard

Comments on “One Hard Bastard”

  1. Jake Bharier says:

    What, no defenestrations?

  2. Mat Snow says:

    I too particularly look forward to the ‘de-limbings’; so much more exciting than those dreary old dismemberings.

    On a further pedantic note, the figure on the cover appears to be outfitted in the style of a late 13th century crusader rather than as a participant in the late 15th century French Wars of Religion.

    All in all, Jonathan would be so proud.

  3. Mat Snow says:

    The above should have read: ‘the late 16th century French Wars of Religion’.

    One Hard Bastard’s thrilling lack of historical exactitude seems to be infectious…

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