« | Home | »

Target: Tehran

Tags: | | |

Target: Tehran by Dudu Geva.

Binyamin Netanyahu recently paid for advertising space on Facebook:

Dear citizen: In each and every generation they rise up against us to destroy us, but our enemies will fail. I invite you to join my Facebook page. Happy Passover.

After this campaign, Netanyahu’s page boasted ten times as many ‘Likes’ as that of Sheli Yechimovich, the leader of the Labor Party. But her staff revealed that only 17 per cent of them were from Israelis. More than half were from Americans, and 5000 were from admirers in Indonesia.

‘Our enemies’ at the moment means Iran. Last month, the Wiesenthal Center sent a letter to donors, quoting an independent Iranian blogger, as if he had any influence on the government, and including an ‘extermination map’ of Israel, which the blogger had taken from Wikipedia. I asked Efraim Zurrof, the centre’s representative in Israel, what he thought of the letter. ‘You know how it is in America,’ he said. ‘All organisations work like that.’

At the same time, two Israeli designers, Roni Edry and Michal Tamir, set up a Facebook page called ‘Israel loves Iran’, an antiwar initiative to bring ordinary Israelis and Iranians together on the social networking site. It now has more than 60,000 ‘Likes’. An Israeli tech company set up a video chat application for Iranians and Israelis to talk to each other.

The right-wing Israeli newspaper Makor Rishon, meanwhile, asked a few experts to simulate the outcome of an Israeli strike on Iran’s ‘extermination reactors’ in a war game. They thought it would be a resounding success for Israel, even without American help. Well, maybe.

Makor Rishon was definitely right about one thing though: the Israeli media will unequivocally support any strike that is carried out, at least to start with. That’s how it is with all Israeli wars. Still, the country’s leading TV satire, Eretz Nehederet (‘Wonderful Country’), has been showing a series of sketches in which two reasonable and sympathetic Iranians are worried about the dangerous lunatics in Israel who want to wipe them out. The program’s creator, Muli Segev, has spoken out against attacking Iran. The antiwar message of the sketches might be clearer, however, if the Iranians weren’t nuclear scientists.

I am one of the curators (with Joshua Simon and Ari Libsker) of Iran, a show at the Spaceship gallery in Tel Aviv. The exhibits include a wax effigy of Ehud Barak by Ari Libsker and Anna Appel calledThe Most Dangerous Person in the World, and a mockumentary about the Israeli Air Force attacking Poland by Ofry Ilani and Yotam Feldman. We had to move Guy Briller’s installation on the roof of the gallery, Nimrod Direct, so it didn’t look like a missile pointing at the US embassy over the road.

Some of the works in the exhibition are genuine documents, including a pamphlet delivered to every postbox in my apartment building. It shows a scary photo of Ahmadinejad, asks: ‘Are you securing the safety of your loved ones?’ – and offers for sale a device that claims to protect you against unconventional weapons. 

Comments on “Target: Tehran”

  1. Pennywhistler says:

    Yeah yeah yeah.

    Still, the primary fact to remeber is that Iran has declared itself to be the enemy of Israel and has vowed to wipe the “Zionists” off the face of the Earth (however you choose to define that).

    You are gambling that the Iranian mullahs are sane.

    And remember that their Shiite religion worships martyrs and martyrdom.

    You are gambling that the Iranian mullahs are not willing to sacrifice 20% of their population to totally destroy the Jewish state.

    You are gambling that they will not use their nuclear umbrella to defend their partners Hezbollah, Hamas and the Gazans, Lebanese and Syrians as THEY rain destruction on Israel.

    We see what the Syrian government is capable of. On their own citizens from a different ethnic group.

    I have no idea what’s on their minds. Do you?

    I have no idea what’s on the Iranian mullah’s minds. Do you?

    What if you bet wrong?

Comment on this post

Log in or register to post a comment.

  • Recent Posts

    RSS – posts

  • Contributors

  • Recent Comments

    • name on Who is the enemy?: Simply stating it is correct doesn't make it so, I just wish you would apply the same epistemic vigilance to "Muslim crimes" as you do to their Hebrew...
    • Glen Newey on Unwinnable War: The legal issue admits of far less clarity than the simple terms in which you – I imagine quite sincerely – frame them. For the benefit of readers...
    • Geoff Roberts on The New Normal: The causes go back a long way into the colonial past, but the more immediate causes stem from the activities of the US forces in the name of freedom a...
    • sol_adelman on The New Normal: There's also the fact that the French state denied the mass drownings of '61 even happened for forty-odd years. No episode in post-war W European hist...
    • funky gibbon on At Wembley: If England get France in the quarter finals of Euro 16 I expect that a good deal of the fraternity will go out the window

    RSS – comments

  • Contact

  • Blog Archive

  • From the LRB Archive

    Edward Said: The Iraq War
    17 April 2003

    ‘This is the most reckless war in modern times. It is all about imperial arrogance unschooled in worldliness, unfettered either by competence or experience, undeterred by history or human complexity, unrepentant in its violence and the cruelty of its technology.’

    David Runciman:
    The Politics of Good Intentions
    8 May 2003

    ‘One of the things that unites all critics of Blair’s war in Iraq, whether from the Left or the Right, is that they are sick of the sound of Blair trumpeting the purity of his purpose, when what matters is the consequences of his actions.’

    Simon Wren-Lewis: The Austerity Con
    19 February 2015

    ‘How did a policy that makes so little sense to economists come to be seen by so many people as inevitable?’

    Hugh Roberts: The Hijackers
    16 July 2015

    ‘American intelligence saw Islamic State coming and was not only relaxed about the prospect but, it appears, positively interested in it.’

Advertisement Advertisement