« | Home | »

Books of the Year

Tags:

It’s almost June. If you worry you have accomplished little in 2011 so far, do not read any of the following, more or less recently published:

Reading the OED: One Man, One Year, 21,730 Pages

The Year of Living Biblically: One Man’s Humble Quest to Follow the Bible as Literally as Possible

The Year of Living Like Jesus: My Journey of Discovering What Jesus Would Really Do

Living Oprah: My One-Year Experiment to Walk the Walk of the Queen of Talk

365 Nights: A Memoir of Intimacy

A Year of Blind Dates: A Single Girl’s Search for ‘The One’

Eat Sleep Sit: My Year at Japan’s Most Rigorous Zen Temple

The Calculus Diaries: A Year Discovering How Maths Can Help You Lose Weight, Win in Vegas, and Survive a Zombie Apocalypse

An Afternoon in Summer: My Year on a South Sea Island, Doing Nothing, Gaining Everything, and Finally Falling in Love

My Freshman Year: What a Professor Learned by Becoming a Student

How I Lived a Year on Just a Pound a Day

Give It Up! My Year of Learning to Live Better

Not Buying It: My Year without Shopping

A Year without ‘Made in China’: One Family’s True Life Adventure in the Global Economy

A Life Stripped Bare: My Year of Trying to Live Ethically

A Year Without Underwear: Exploring the World on a Bicycle

Talking to Zeus: My Year in a Greek Garden

365 Thank Yous: The Year a Simple Act of Daily Gratitude Changed My Life

Tolstoy and the Purple Chair: My Year of Magical Reading

The Happiness Project: Or, Why I Spent a Year Trying to Sing in the Morning, Clean My Closets, Fight Right, Read Aristotle, and Generally Have More Fun

The Beauty Experiment: How I Skipped the Lipstick, Cut My Hair, Forgot Fashion, and Faced the World without Concealer for a Year… and Made Over My Life

The Doper Next Door: My Strange and Scandalous Year on Performance-Enhancing Drugs

Voluntary Madness: My Year Lost and Found in the Loony Bin

Orange Is the New Black: My Year in a Women’s Prison

Sweater Quest: My Year of Knitting Dangerously

Comments on “Books of the Year”

  1. cappio says:

    However could you have missed Chastened: The Unexpected Story of My Year Without Sex?

  2. alex says:

    Addendum:
    Andy McBean, A Year on the Bog: 1 man, 1 stopwatch, 12 months, 273 toilets (Southbank Publishing)

  3. Bob Beck says:

    “Meta, or, My Year of Years: My Year Spent Reading All The ‘My Year Spent…’ Books.”

  4. cappio says:

    Actually, that was a blog: http://myyearofeverything.tumblr.com/.
    Evidently Chastened finished the poor guy off.

    • Bob Beck says:

      … well, I’ll be jiggered (as someone said in the latest LRB). Another reminder, as if I needed it, that it’s as hard to produce satire as to have an original idea.

      In truth I hadn’t realized “Chastened” was a real book. I’d taken that title for a joke, and a good one at that.

      • cappio says:

        I only know about these books because I once thought about writing one–about reading all of Shakespeare in a year. When I realized how overdone–and silly–the genre is, as this post demonstrates, I decided just to
        blog
        about Shakespeare.

Comment on this post

Log in or register to post a comment.


  • Recent Posts

    RSS – posts

  • Contributors

  • Recent Comments

    • andymartinink on Reacher v. Parker: Slayground definitely next on my agenda. But to be fair to Lee Child, as per the Forbes analysis, there is clearly a massive collective reader-writer ...
    • Robert Hanks on Reacher v. Parker: And in Breakout, Parker, in prison, teams up with a black guy to escape; another white con dislikes it but accepts the necessity; Parker is absolutely...
    • Robert Hanks on Reacher v. Parker: Parker may not have the integrity and honesty of Marlowe, but I'd argue that Richard Stark writes with far more of both than Raymond Chandler does: Ch...
    • Christopher Tayler on Reacher v. Parker: Good to see someone holding up standards. The explanation is that I had thoughts - or words - left over from writing about Lee Child. (For Chandler se...
    • Geoff Roberts on Reacher v. Parker: ..."praised in the London Review of Books" Just read the article on Lee Child in a certain literary review and was surprised to find this rave notice...

    RSS – comments

  • Contact

  • Blog Archive

  • From the LRB Archive

    Chris Lehmann: The Candidates
    18 June 2015

    ‘Every one of the Republican candidates can be described as a full-blown adult failure. These are people who, in most cases, have been granted virtually every imaginable advantage on the road to success, and managed nevertheless to foul things up along the way.’

    Hugh Pennington:
    The Problem with Biodiversity
    10 May 2007

    ‘As a medical microbiologist, for example, I have spent my career fighting biodiversity: my ultimate aim has been to cause the extinction of harmful microbes, an objective shared by veterinary and plant pathologists. But despite more than a hundred years of concentrated effort, supported by solid science, smallpox has been the only success.’

    Jeremy Harding: At the Mexican Border
    20 October 2011

    ‘The battle against illegal migration is a domestic version of America’s interventions overseas, with many of the same trappings: big manpower commitments, militarisation, pursuit, detection, rendition, loss of life. The Mexican border was already the focus of attention before 9/11; it is now a fixation that shows no signs of abating.’

    James Meek: When the Floods Came
    31 July 2008

    ‘Last July, a few days after the floods arrived, with 350,000 people still cut off from the first necessity of life, Severn Trent held its annual general meeting. It announced profits of £325 million, and confirmed a dividend for shareholders of £143 million. Not long afterwards the company, with the consent of the water regulator Ofwat, announced that it wouldn’t be compensating customers: all would be charged as if they had had running water, even when they hadn’t.’

Advertisement Advertisement