« | Home | »

The Nardac’s Wife

Tags: |

Royal occasions offer the pleasure of mass atavism, including the revival of antediluvian words and attitudes. As journalists and newsreaders constantly drool, Catherine Middleton is a ‘commoner’. When her wedding was announced, the word turned up in the Mail and the Telegraph, even – though in bet-hedging scare quotes – in the ‘liberal’ Guardian. The overseas press has been at it too. The other day, France 24 told its viewers that the prince was to wed a roturier; the Corriere della Sera said that he was marrying a borghese. It reopens neighbouring semantic fields, notably the use of ‘common’ to mean ‘not distinguished’, ‘vulgar, of plebeian origin, nature (derog.)’, as in ‘a common prostitute’, ‘common as muck’ and so on.

Perhaps journalists with copy to file on this vacuous topic only pretend to take seriously the idea that humans, like racehorses, can be sorted into thoroughbreds and also-rans. But it seems to be held in earnest by the Prince of Wales, who notoriously put his unflappable reaction down to ‘a thousand years of breeding’ when a prankster let off a starting-pistol near him during a visit to Australia in 1994. No doubt when on marriage the queen makes her fiancé Nardac of Gunderland, Ms Middleton will be able to leave her vulgar origins behind. Until then, in fact, Prince William counts as a commoner too, as he’s neither yet the sovereign nor a peer of the realm. But then if we go back a bit, we’re all the offspring of apes, some no doubt commoner than others.

Comments on “The Nardac’s Wife”

  1. alex says:

    Are professors commoners?

  2. Joe Morison says:

    The OED‘s most relevant definition of ‘commoner’ is “2.a More generally: One of the common people; a member of the commonalty. (Now applied to all below the rank of a peer.)”. Is this really true of HRH Prince William? What is the ranking between peers and the monarch and the rest of us? If Mr. Newey is in possession of this esoteric knowledge, he must share it.

    If this sounds mad, you should try living in the middle of it. I walked past Buck Palace today, i have only ever seen so many film crews together on film – everywhere there were cameras and people commenting and interviewing, there’s a new triple height studio block that overlooks the palace and fronts an intensely compacted compound of the world’s media that is the size of a small village and has a hundred massive satellite dishes; hyperreality in action.

  3. Bob Beck says:

    Speaking of common, or rather uncommon, it’s a pity Googlewhacking seems to be over. (Isn’t it? The home page thereof hasn’t been updated in years). Google “nardac” and “gunderland” (without quotes, of course), and this page is the only one you’ll find.

Comment on this post

Log in or register to post a comment.

  • Recent Posts

    RSS – posts

  • Contributors

  • Recent Comments

    • Neil Kitson on Unwinnable War Two: There is no Chapter VII support for military action in Resolution 2249.
    • pinkycubin on Unwinnable War Two: Streetsj, It is obvious there is no clear 'solution'. That doesn't therefore mean that the use of ordnance dropped from height is part of the answ...
    • soadenubi on Being Lord Lugard: As a Nigerian normally resident in Lagos, I found the blog:Being Lord Lugard a most interesting read. This note is primarily a request that the Autho...
    • streetsj on Unwinnable War Two: Yes. So what's your solution? A negotiated settlement of peace for everyone. And who would disagree - but realistically what is the answer? One thing...
    • streetsj on What does Osborne want?: I have thought since 2010 that much of the most austere rhetoric has been directed at the financial markets. Meanwhile reality is very different as pu...

    RSS – comments

  • Contact

  • Blog Archive

  • From the LRB Archive

    Edward Said: The Iraq War
    17 April 2003

    ‘This is the most reckless war in modern times. It is all about imperial arrogance unschooled in worldliness, unfettered either by competence or experience, undeterred by history or human complexity, unrepentant in its violence and the cruelty of its technology.’

    David Runciman:
    The Politics of Good Intentions
    8 May 2003

    ‘One of the things that unites all critics of Blair’s war in Iraq, whether from the Left or the Right, is that they are sick of the sound of Blair trumpeting the purity of his purpose, when what matters is the consequences of his actions.’

    Simon Wren-Lewis: The Austerity Con
    19 February 2015

    ‘How did a policy that makes so little sense to economists come to be seen by so many people as inevitable?’

    Hugh Roberts: The Hijackers
    16 July 2015

    ‘American intelligence saw Islamic State coming and was not only relaxed about the prospect but, it appears, positively interested in it.’

Advertisement Advertisement