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Afghanistan: Before the Fall

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A friend in Afghanistan reminded me of what might have been had the West used Najibullah, the Afghan president abandoned by the Soviet Union, as their pawn rather than green-lighting the Pakistan-backed Taliban take-over of the country. In this last desperate interview with the New York Times in March 1992, a few months before he was toppled and hanged by the Taliban, Najibullah warned:

If fundamentalism comes to Afghanistan, war will continue for many more years… Afghanistan will turn into a center of world smuggling for narcotic drugs. Afghanistan will be turned into a center for terrorism.

Najibullah was a former head of the secret police and had sent many to their deaths, but everything is relative, especially with hindsight and especially in Afghanistan. It might have been a different story if…

Comments on “Afghanistan: Before the Fall”

  1. Oliver Rivers says:

    “It might have been a different story if…” what?

    I’m all for suggestive ellipses, but I wonder if the bottom half of this post has gone missing.

    • semitone says:

      The clue is in the first sentence. If “the West used Najibullah, the Afghan president abandoned by the Soviet Union, as their pawn rather than green-lighting the Pakistan-backed Taliban take-over of the country.”

      It’s a shame Tariq didn’t write that, actually. If he had, his article would have been in sonata form. That would have been neat.

      • Oliver Rivers says:

        Well, a rather basic one. The recapitulation should vary or develop the exposition, not just repeat it.

        There’s a whole lot missing here. If the Americans had chosen to prop up a different crook in the 90s, as opposed to waiting a decade and then installing the crook they’re propping up now, then–what? Things might actually look pretty much the same. Perhaps we’d be ten years closer to a stable, non-fundamentalist Afghanistan, or perhaps we’d just have had ten more years of corruption in Kabul plus Taliban insurgency.

        • semitone says:

          You’re right, oliver and I’m sorry if I seemed flippantly rude. You will probably turn out to be the king of Sweden.

          But if the lrb is going to be the best magazine of its kind, why can’t it have a better blog? If it’s going to have writers like Tariq Ali (who presumably doesn’t come cheap, and who definitely has strong opinions about lots of things, including Afghanistan) why can’t it get him to write proper, informative blog posts?

          Oliver’s comment that there’s a whole lot missing here seems to apply to the whole blog, not just Tariq’s castrated sonata.

  2. Joe Morison says:

    I’d never have thought of there being much sympathy between the views of Tariq Ali and Saki, but i’ve just read the following in ‘The Chronicles of Clovis’:

    “Where I think you political spade-workers are so silly,” said the Duke, “is in the misdirection of your efforts. You spend thousands of pounds of money, and Heaven knows how much dynamic force of brain power and personal energy, in trying to elect or displace this or that man, whereas you could gain your ends so much more simply by making use of the men as you find them. If they don’t suit your purpose as they are, transform them into something more satisfactory.”

  3. Joe Morison says:

    We seem to be in the grip of a temporal anomaly.

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