« | Home | »


Tags: |

There’s an oddly fawning interview with the work and pensions secretary in today’s Guardian. Iain Duncan Smith is apparently a ‘politician with no personal ambition’ whose only aim is ‘to help the worst off’. He’s got all sorts of schemes to get people off benefits and into work, improve their quality of life in the process, and, in the long term, save the government a great deal of money. What a miracle worker. There’s some indication even in the Guardian, however, that the Tory noises about making everyone better off and Britain a fairer place are too good to be true. Talking vaguely about plans to change the way that child poverty is measured, Duncan Smith complains that under the present system,

You get this constant juddering adjustment with poverty figures going up when, for instance, upper incomes rise.

Yet more evidence, in case it was needed, that all the Tories’ talk of ‘fairness’ has nothing whatever to do with equality.

Comments on “Juddering”

  1. pinhut says:

    The same IDS who was disowned by scientists for manipulating data from brain research to suit his ends? Oh yes, the same.

    “A leading neuroscientist has accused the Tory social policy tsar Iain Duncan Smith of distorting his research into childhood neglect and the effect it has on the size and development of children’s brains.

    Dr Bruce Perry reacted following comments made by the former Tory leader in which he has suggested children brought up in abusive or neglectful households could develop smaller brains.

    In one recent speech, Duncan Smith was recorded on a mobile phone appearing to draw a link between brain development in young children and people committing crime in later life.

    Dr Perry, who runs the respected Child Trauma Academy in Texas, said Duncan Smith had “greatly misrepresented” and “distorted” his work.

    His research assessed the brain development of children who suffered extreme forms of neglect – such as those locked in a basement without human contact – and he said it was wrong to apply the findings to children who have undergone far less severe neglect, such as those from broken homes.”


  2. Joe Morison says:

    That’s IDS for you, never the brightest penny in the purse. But those Tories more on message do talk of true fairness: to quote Jonathan Freedland in the Guardian “Cameron likes to bang on about Labour’s record on inequality, lamenting that the gap between rich and poor has grown wider since 1997″.

    I’m always puzzled when i hear it – what are they going to say in 5 years time when it is pointed out that the gap has grown even wider, hide behind the fig leaf that Labour did no better? They can’t believe that their free market approach will make the poor even richer than it makes the rich; and even my spectacles are not so rose coloured that i could even hope that they intend to close the gap by redistributing income. It’s a mystery.

  3. alex says:

    you have to like ‘constant juddering adjustment’, or CJI as professional engineers call it. It’s good that IDS said it in an OFI as well.

Comment on this post

Log in or register to post a comment.

  • Recent Posts

    RSS – posts

  • Contributors

  • Recent Comments

    • Neil Kitson on Unwinnable War Two: There is no Chapter VII support for military action in Resolution 2249.
    • pinkycubin on Unwinnable War Two: Streetsj, It is obvious there is no clear 'solution'. That doesn't therefore mean that the use of ordnance dropped from height is part of the answ...
    • soadenubi on Being Lord Lugard: As a Nigerian normally resident in Lagos, I found the blog:Being Lord Lugard a most interesting read. This note is primarily a request that the Autho...
    • streetsj on Unwinnable War Two: Yes. So what's your solution? A negotiated settlement of peace for everyone. And who would disagree - but realistically what is the answer? One thing...
    • streetsj on What does Osborne want?: I have thought since 2010 that much of the most austere rhetoric has been directed at the financial markets. Meanwhile reality is very different as pu...

    RSS – comments

  • Contact

  • Blog Archive

  • From the LRB Archive

    Edward Said: The Iraq War
    17 April 2003

    ‘This is the most reckless war in modern times. It is all about imperial arrogance unschooled in worldliness, unfettered either by competence or experience, undeterred by history or human complexity, unrepentant in its violence and the cruelty of its technology.’

    David Runciman:
    The Politics of Good Intentions
    8 May 2003

    ‘One of the things that unites all critics of Blair’s war in Iraq, whether from the Left or the Right, is that they are sick of the sound of Blair trumpeting the purity of his purpose, when what matters is the consequences of his actions.’

    Simon Wren-Lewis: The Austerity Con
    19 February 2015

    ‘How did a policy that makes so little sense to economists come to be seen by so many people as inevitable?’

    Hugh Roberts: The Hijackers
    16 July 2015

    ‘American intelligence saw Islamic State coming and was not only relaxed about the prospect but, it appears, positively interested in it.’

Advertisement Advertisement